Feed, Grit & Oyster Shells Separate?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by becstalls, Nov 6, 2010.

  1. becstalls

    becstalls Out Of The Brooder

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    May 22, 2010
    Hi all. Is it better to offer feed, grit, and oyster shells separately rather than mixing them all together? This is my first flock and I've been mixing, but from what I've started to read on here, that's not a good idea. Should I offer separately? [​IMG] Thanks!
     
  2. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They should be seperate. The birds that need the calcium and/or grit will be able to eat it and those that don't won't be forced to consume what they don't need while they eat their food.

    I use old rabbit feeders to put the oyster shell in (I don't feed grit since mine freerange and have ample natural sources) but any container will work.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2010
  3. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I always separate them. They know how much they need of each. I don't. If they want it, they can get it. If they don't want it, why should their body work harder than it should to eliminate the excess? If they eat too much calcium, their kidneys have to work extra hard to get the excess out of their bodies. Too much grit can be a problem too.
     
  4. becstalls

    becstalls Out Of The Brooder

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    Any good suggestions of how to offer separately without making a mess? Bowls seem like a bad idea.
     
  5. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I took a plastic yogurt container, the pint size, and wired it to the wire in the run, the top maybe 8 to 10 inches off the ground. I only put an inch or so in the bottom and they do not spill much of it. I did poke a hole near the bottom so water will drain out.
     
  6. 7L Farm

    7L Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I got this idea from a BYC'er. I don't feed grit but I do provide oyster shells. At first I had it in a bowl raised up & screwed to the side, inside the coop.Chicks kept scratching pine shaving in it . So I built this.[​IMG]
     
  7. GoldenCometLady

    GoldenCometLady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I took a plastic coffee can and cut a hole near the bottom big enough
    to get one chicken head in. Then nailed it to the wall and put the lid
    back on. Works pretty good that is until someone decided to jump up
    on the top of it. It is only up by one nail now as the top one pulled through.
    Still using it until I am forced to make something else. I like the idea of
    the plastic drain pipe. I may do that. I feed crushed egg shells though
    instead of buying oyster shell. It works great.
     
  8. becstalls

    becstalls Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks! What diameter is that pipe? I have some 1" floating around. Would that be too narrow?
     
  9. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    I started out with everything separate. Now I've gone to mixing in some oyster shell and grit as I prepare my morning bucket for the boys and girls. Works for me. I noticed an increased (read they eat it now- woohoo!) consumption in both after mixing it in.
     
  10. woodmort

    woodmort Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a separate bin-type of feeder on the wall that I keep filled with oyster shell. When I feed grit I just toss it on the coop floor and let the birds find it. Normally I don't use the stuff for anyone but chicks and, occasionally during the winter when they've been confined for a long period.
     

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