Feed storage? In the bag or not?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Kasilofchrisn, Dec 4, 2016.

  1. Kasilofchrisn

    Kasilofchrisn Out Of The Brooder

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    So I bought a smaller metal trash can (20 gallon) to store my feed in.
    I'm going to use my 32 gallon can for my whole corn,scratch,oyster shell and grit.
    I was thinking I could get 2 bags of feed in there if I dump it out of the bag into the can.
    No real benefit other than buying feed less often.
    My current can is cluttered and I'm always moving bags around to get things out so decided this would help.
    So do you dump out your bags or just store the bag in the metal can?
    What's your preference and why?
     
  2. Den in Penn

    Den in Penn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I store in bags. I have an old wooden feed bin in the barn that we used to dump the bags into, then scoop feed out of to feed the cows and horses when I was a kid. I store the bags in in that. Then dump the bags in buckets as needed, two five gallon buckets to a fifty pound bag. I get ten bags at a time so I would need around five of those twenty gallon cans to dump into. Since the bin was already there and it fits the decor of the barn it gets used. Don't under rate the connivance of buying what you need for six weeks to save on trips.
     
  3. barneveldrerman

    barneveldrerman Chillin' With My Peeps

    If you are looking to get more feed in the can then I would dump the bag otherwise it is more on your preference.

    Hope this helps. If you have anymore questions don't hesitate to ask.:cool:
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2016
  4. rosemarythyme

    rosemarythyme Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I just dump it into the can, no real reason other than to save space so that the can holds more.
     
  5. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    If dumping into the can, I'd want to be sure to empty the can before adding more feed. Otherwise, the stuff at the bottom could get pretty stale.
     
  6. Kasilofchrisn

    Kasilofchrisn Out Of The Brooder

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    Yes the goal is more feed stored if it is just dumped.
    The can lid will be secured with a bungee cord.
    I didn't have it in my budget or design to include inside feed storage.
    I have a large plastic flip lid can that holds my pine shavings. Then I have the 32 gallon metal can for feed,treats,oyster shell,and grit.
    I don't need to get at the grit or oyster shell often.
    But do like to give them a handful or two of corn or scratch daily.
    This new can will make it easier to get at the treats so I can switch it up daily.
    I only have 8 chicken's so feed use isn't that bad.
    Just don't want to find my feed went bad or something due to the storage method.
    I will empty it before refilling.
    I'm also going to raise it up a bit to eliminate some of the bending over as it gets emptier.
    Thanks for the replies.
     
  7. McGnugget

    McGnugget Out Of The Brooder

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    5 gallon buckets with a rubber air-tight ring in the lid.
     
  8. Kasilofchrisn

    Kasilofchrisn Out Of The Brooder

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    I thought of that but then I've got four buckets with lids instead of one can.
    Buckets and lids would cost more than the can also.
    I already bought the can and dumped in a fresh bag of feed.
    Them dumped my partial bag on top of that.
    It's raised up a bit also so very little bending over.
    So far I'm liking it.
    My bigger can now has 50# bags of whole corn and scratch in it for daily treats.
    They only get a handful or two of treats daily but it's nice not having to move stuff around to get at the different bags.
    Whatever I'm doing is working as even in sub zero winter temps I get 4-6 eggs daily from my 7 hens.
    I think the treats definitely help as does the light timer.
     
  9. McGnugget

    McGnugget Out Of The Brooder

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    Wow! Sub zero temps and still laying? Those must be some good heat lights.
     
  10. Kasilofchrisn

    Kasilofchrisn Out Of The Brooder

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    It's their first winter and my first time with chickens in 20 years.
    Our temps have been up and down from -20*f up to +20*f in the last few weeks.
    But yes they're laying just fine!
     

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