1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Feeding an injured duck in a small 'crate' indoors?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by jmc, Nov 9, 2009.

  1. jmc

    jmc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 22, 2008
    South Central MA
    I need to build a little cage for 'hospitalizing' any bird for any reason.

    If you keep an injured/sick bird indoors in such a little thing, how can you really feed them and water them in such a smallish space?

    I am assuming the bird is brought INDOORS, also (but I suppose the same or similar might apply if you left the bird outdoors in the little cage............)

    Will one really drink from a small cup thing clothespinned to the wire, etc. or is it better to take a bird OUT of cage.

    But if the bird is skittish (like my Campbells are) such a one could go beserk in trying to get away (here I am thinking of doing such in a bathroom or tub....)

    Recently I had a bird devoured by infection that went systemic; some suggested that I bring her inside and put her in a small cage to keep her warm.

    The question--aside from the fact that I do NOT have a small cage (yet!)--that came to me immediately was, "Right, like nervous Marissa is gonna eat and drink in this strange cage........"

    Sorry to babble. But how do you feed and water an indoor 'hospitalized' bird?
     
  2. GrannySue

    GrannySue Chillin' With My Peeps

    I've just had 2 runner ducks in a fairly large crate in my bathroom for a week. They're incredibly skittish birds.
    I used a fairly large dog bowl for their water, enough for them to get their nares (nostrils) into it. They wouldn't eat pellets but were happy to gobble up scratch and greens once I'd left the room.
    The reason I had them confined was that 1 of them needed daily antibiotics and I brought a friend in to keep her company. If I had to do it again I would probably have kept her alone. Maybe she would have become more used to handling without the other one going frantic.

    It was messy and smelly of course. Daily cleaning was a must. I grabbed them and put them into the bathtub while I changed the shavings.
    They were very pleased to be released a couple of days ago, returned to the flock as if nothing had happened.
     
  3. Bossroo

    Bossroo Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,450
    16
    171
    Jun 15, 2008
    John, when you build a small containment cage, make one of the narrow ends with slats ( like jail bars) with them wide enough apart to easily allow the head and neck through. Place 2 heavy ( clay) bowls on the outside of the cage slats for feed and water. If you make the cage out of wire, place towels over it except leave the slated side open. This will help to keep the bird calmer.
     
  4. keeperofthehearth

    keeperofthehearth Chillin' With My Peeps

    If you make the cage out of wire, place towels over it except leave the slated side open. This will help to keep the bird calmer

    This is good for both chooks and ducks. You can always try drawing the towels/blanket part way off during the day for additional light while watching for anxiety behavior. If they get too frantic/nervous just leave the covering on.​
     
  5. jmc

    jmc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 22, 2008
    South Central MA
    Bob and Barb!

    Oh that is really helpful info. and I am glad to have some nice wide wire that I can use for one of the 'narrow' ends.
     
  6. L0rraine

    L0rraine Chillin' With My Peeps

    810
    4
    133
    May 20, 2009
    Whidbey Island
    Quote:Wow - a couple of really good ideas! I'll have to 'file' them away for any of my future needs. Thanks!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by