Feeding and taking care of a donkey (?)

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Hope119, Dec 14, 2011.

  1. Hope119

    Hope119 Chillin' With My Peeps

    168
    0
    119
    Apr 23, 2009
    Does anyone here has experience with miniature donkeys?

    The one that is here is a miniature donkey about 5 months old. They say here http://www.pamarosapond.com/care.htm about 2lbs of hay twice a day. So far this guy has been getting here about a flake of hay in the morning and one in the evening. Some sources say one flake is 5 lbs, so we might be overfeeding. How do we know if we are, besides weighting a flake of hay?
    Is it okay that once a day he will be getting a treat of an apple core or a broccoli stem (about 2 inches tall)? Or is it too much? My landlord seemed nervous (it is his donkey, but we both take care of him) when I was feeding him broccoli stem one day.

    At this moment the donkey has a rather small fenced area, square, made of cattle fence panels. He often goes in it back and force, back and force, from one wall to another. Is this normal? My friend said "like a caged tiger". Do they just need to walk a lot?

    He has few "bold" spots on his back - like if his hair was pulled out of there. Is this normal?

    What shelters do your donkeys have in winter?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Tracydr

    Tracydr Chillin' With My Peeps

    I think it's much like caring for a small pony. Use very low quality ( low sugars) hay. A little alfalfa for protein. I wouldn't use any grain at all, maybe just a little alfalfa pellets or cubes for treats out of your hands. It's amazing how little it takes to make them fat and cause founder.
    I would go to The Chrinicle of the Horse forums and read all you can about low glycemic diets, cushings disease and founder as these will be your biggest problems.
    Good luck, they're little cuties!
    I learned to drive on donkeys and a small mule before I learned to ride. I was about 5 years old, maybe younger.
     
  3. critterrun

    critterrun Chillin' With My Peeps

    365
    0
    101
    Oct 6, 2011
    NJ
    hello

    I have a mini donk they are great
    they need a friend they dont like being alone

    the more room they have the better

    mine has a run in shed 3 sided deep enough to get out of the weather
    is he on grass ??? that makes a differance on feeding


    mine have no to little grass
    mine gets about 1 cup pellets 2x day and 1 flke 2x day
    if really cold or windy 3 flakes of hay so he stays warm

    they need to be wormed every 6-8 weeks too

    apples ok not sure about broccoli to much gas

    yours is still a baby I think he needs some grain (low protien)
    I would ask a Vet!!!
    did he have his shots yet good time to ask the vet about what they would feed
    how is his weight does he have grass does he have company have his feet been done

    sorry lots of questions
    but they help me answer your question not bashing you just questions

    there is a mini donkey group on yahoo they are nice and lots of answers

    hope that helps some
    you are welcome to PM me with any questions and I will try to help
     
  4. critterrun

    critterrun Chillin' With My Peeps

    365
    0
    101
    Oct 6, 2011
    NJ
    where are you

    that matters too
    I am in NJ
     
  5. Chicky-dees

    Chicky-dees Chillin' With My Peeps

    121
    4
    91
    Oct 6, 2011
    good questions, critterrun! All very important - everyone has good advice so far.

    Do you have a picture of him?? Minis are adorable.
     
  6. Chicky-dees

    Chicky-dees Chillin' With My Peeps

    121
    4
    91
    Oct 6, 2011
    Oh and the bald spots (ugh) look closely and see if you see any flaky skin around the hair line - is the skin fresh and clean and normal colored or red, inflamed - thick or broken - any of the above?

    If I see anything like this I attack it with a good wash with betadine scrub on the bald spot and at least 2 inches surrounding, count to 100 then wash it off, then wash again with anti-bacterial dawn soap. Kills any bacteria that might be living in/around/skin and hair follicles. If it isn't a bacteria problem, then after a wash he will have cleaner and nicer bald spots then! LOL! Anyway, that is a good over-the-counter solution. Hard to tell without seeing it so don't know what it is but the above wouldn't hurt. Humid weather and sudden cold then hot days really bring out the skin bugs down here and the above remedy is tried and true here in TX.
     
  7. Debbiesflocks

    Debbiesflocks Chillin' With My Peeps

    150
    2
    91
    Jul 20, 2011
    Washington
    Pacing is 100% boredom. This little guy needs a job so he dont learn a bunch of bad habbits.
     
  8. Hope119

    Hope119 Chillin' With My Peeps

    168
    0
    119
    Apr 23, 2009
    Thanks to everyone for all your answers so far!
    He is not on grass.
    Don't have pictures yet.
    We are in NY, about an hour from NJ border, probably.
    Bold spots are not red, that is for sure. I'll try to take pictures, if I find time.
    I have no idea on shots. If it is not required by law, I would not do them, if he was mine. My landlord gives vaccine shots to his kids, so maybe he'll do same for his animals.
    He does get some pellets (landlord feeds him with it, not sure if every day), not much.
    I wounder if it is possible to tell by looking at him if he overeats.
    Do yours roll in something? What is better to have under him - bare ground or wood chips?
    Do yours chase chickens? He chases my chickens out of his pen.
     
  9. Hope119

    Hope119 Chillin' With My Peeps

    168
    0
    119
    Apr 23, 2009
    Quote:what kind of job? I think he was initially meant to be a guarding donkey, but 1) he is young, 2) there is no perimeter fence (my chickens do get out to the road).
    Can a donkey be taught to walk by the owner on a leash... to make a trail, for example?
     
  10. RHRanch

    RHRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

    I don't know a lot about donkeys, but my friend who is involved with donkey rescued says that many make the mistake of thinking that they can handle wet & cold weather like horses can, but they can't - they need shelter.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by