Feeding baby chicks 24% protien

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by 12thmanjim, Jan 23, 2011.

  1. 12thmanjim

    12thmanjim Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 8, 2011
    I have 200 new baby chicks, and I have been feeding them 24% for about 10 days. They look good, have lost very few birds, but
    was wondering how long I will stay with this feed. I am considering going to a 20% or lower and mixing it with cracked corn.

    What do you think?
     
  2. bock

    bock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 10, 2008
    Northern CA
    I would mix it with rolled oats, but cracked corn would probably not be good for young birds.
     
  3. MrsPinkKitty

    MrsPinkKitty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Cracked corn is like giveing them candy. i give cracked corn to some of my gals becasue they love it ...love it [​IMG]
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    No cracked corn, IMO. Why not get a starter/grower combo that is about 18% protein? That's all I can get around here. Mine stay on that till almost laying age. If you feed them too much other than the proper starter/grower at this age, they won't grow to their full potential. I've seen chicks who were raised on scratch and layer feed and, sadly, they were awfully stunted.
     
  5. 12thmanjim

    12thmanjim Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:I'll look for the 18% combo, I am trying to cut costs some. The 24 is 15.99 a bag, and they're almost done with the second one. They're all roosters I want to fatten them up, put some in the freezer, and sell the rest.
     
  6. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Ok, if they're all roosters you plan to eat, that's somewhat different. They won't be producing eggs or live long enough to have health issues. There is a feed for broiler chicks, I think, but I have no idea if it's any cheaper than what you're feeding now. Turkey grower maybe?
     
  7. catdaddy66

    catdaddy66 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 18, 2009
    Lugoff, SC
    I have never taken mine off of higher protein feed for starter or grower. At the early growth stages I feel they need the higher protein levels (20-24%) to build tissue of all types like muscle, bone, feather and skin, etc. This high level is also recommended during a molt when they have to feather out again. I asked around and many BYC members keep their flock on the starter feed thru the entire life cycle. Meaties need this to develop their muscle tissue for us to eat. If you have dual purpose birds they need to gain size as well. I really don't see a downside to high protein feed, IMO.

    It also keeps you from having to know what feed for what bird/purpose/health issue. One feed for all is very simple and doesn't tax my feeble memory.[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2011
  8. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    24% isn't high for their age, but the OP wanted a cheaper alternative, I think.
     
  9. 12thmanjim

    12thmanjim Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 8, 2011
    Yup I am trying to find a cheaper alternative, and not sacrifice too much on speed of growth. Also I am targeting the Mt Airy NC auction house when it reopens in march to sell most of these.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2011
  10. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    It may be unpopular to say it, but with that high test racing fuel you're feeding them, a higher proportion of lesser grains would save you considerably and not effect their performance in any noticeable way. It's winter and they are eating a lot, right?

    Check on mixed grain, aka, scratch. At $9 a 50 lb bag, it will cut your cost considerably. Shoot, average the 8% protein of the mixed grain bag with the 24% high octane feed and you'll bring your feed cost down to $11 a 50 and your protein would be the average of 16% which is exactly what most of feed mature hens. That's a 50/50. If you'd feel better about a 70/30 blend, so be it.
     

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