Feeding eggshells from commercial eggs - Yes or No

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Mommysongbird, Sep 23, 2011.

  1. Mommysongbird

    Mommysongbird Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 17, 2011
    Small Town, Virginia
    Our pullets have been laying for a few weeks now, they are 23 weeks old.

    I have been giving them their egg shells once they are dried out. It isn't a lot, so I asked my mom and my daughter to save theirs (from store bought eggs) but now I am worried about giving them those. Thinking that since they are commercial eggs and are NOT organic, maybe the shells aren't so good for our chickens. What do you think??

    I also posted this on the Facebook page b/c I could not post here for a bit.
     
  2. clairabean

    clairabean Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 7, 2010
    Kootenays of BC!
    I would not. Who knows what those store eggs are treated with?
     
  3. Mommysongbird

    Mommysongbird Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 17, 2011
    Small Town, Virginia
    Quote:Yeah, that was my thoughts too after my mom brought me a sh** load of egg shells. I thought maybe I could just throw them out in the compost, but I still have reserves on that as well. [​IMG]
     
  4. justmeinflorida

    justmeinflorida Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 16, 2011
    Zephyrhills, Florida
    Quote:Yeah, that was my thoughts too after my mom brought me a sh** load of egg shells. I thought maybe I could just throw them out in the compost, but I still have reserves on that as well. [​IMG]

    If you decide not to give them to your rooster or use them in your compost...you can always crush them up put them in an unrinsed empty milk container and let the water sit for a couple of weeks. Then water your plants (not veggies) with the water and shells. I've had great luck doing this and my plants are big and beautiful.

    Copy pasted:

    Why should you put egg shells in your garden?

    Crushed egg shells add valuable nutrients to soil. Calcium is essential for cell growth in all plants. Calcium is especially important for fast growing plants because they quickly deplete the surrounding soil of calcium. Egg shells should be washed before you place them in a compose or into your garden.

    Make sure you crush the egg shells before you add them to your garden. Egg shells that are not crushed will break down very slowly.

    Ways you can use egg shells grounds in your garden:

    * Instead of throwing eggs shells away, put them in the bottom of plant pots instead of stones. Egg shells are much lighter than stones and they are a great source of of nutrition.
    * Place egg shells in a circle on top of the ground surface around tender plant stems such as peppers, tomatoes, broccoli, cabbage to deter slugs and cutworms.
    * Place egg shells in the soil near tomatoes. Calcium is very useful to tomatoes because the extra calcium will help prevent blossom end rot.

    Can egg shells be used along with coffee grounds?

    Yes. Egg shells provide calcium to your garden while coffee grounds provide a high content of nitrogen to your garden. Calcium and nitrogen supplements (egg shells and coffee grounds) will help keep your garden soil and plants healthy.
    Source(s):
    http://www.mamashealth.com/garden/eggshe…
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2011
  5. ladyride

    ladyride Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 30, 2011
    East Tn
    i wouldn't but jmho.
     
  6. aggie9296

    aggie9296 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 28, 2011
    Panama City, FL
    Storebought eggshells are fine to give to chickens. But if you are marketing yours as organic, then the ones you feed must be organic too. Other than that, they are not dangerous and are a good source of calcium. I do cook them first so I kill any surface bacteria that may be on them.
     
  7. duckinnut

    duckinnut Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 18, 2010
    Marshfield, Ma.
    Quote:Yeah, that was my thoughts too after my mom brought me a sh** load of egg shells. I thought maybe I could just throw them out in the compost, but I still have reserves on that as well. [​IMG]

    Not to change the subject but I often hear the term "sh**load" as a unit of measure. I guess my question is how do you measure it out in a recipe? I went to the kitchen store and could not find a cup that measures that. [​IMG]
     
  8. Oregon Blues

    Oregon Blues Overrun With Chickens

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    Apr 14, 2011
    Central Oregon
    Will you be supplying them with eggs?

    If so, let them go ahead and form the habit to bring you their eggs shells. Once they are using the eggs you raise, the shells will be fine.

    I don't worry about commercial egg shells, but if you are worried about them, don't feed them.
     
  9. justmeinflorida

    justmeinflorida Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 16, 2011
    Zephyrhills, Florida
    Quote:Yeah, that was my thoughts too after my mom brought me a sh** load of egg shells. I thought maybe I could just throw them out in the compost, but I still have reserves on that as well. [​IMG]

    Not to change the subject but I often hear the term "sh**load" as a unit of measure. I guess my question is how do you measure it out in a recipe? I went to the kitchen store and could not find a cup that measures that. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Mommysongbird

    Mommysongbird Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 17, 2011
    Small Town, Virginia
    Quote:Yeah, that was my thoughts too after my mom brought me a sh** load of egg shells. I thought maybe I could just throw them out in the compost, but I still have reserves on that as well. [​IMG]

    Not to change the subject but I often hear the term "sh**load" as a unit of measure. I guess my question is how do you measure it out in a recipe? I went to the kitchen store and could not find a cup that measures that. [​IMG]

    [​IMG] HA HA

    This is how we talk in VA
     

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