Feeding for winter

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Angiebubs, Oct 29, 2011.

  1. Angiebubs

    Angiebubs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello!

    I've read how some people feed their chickens corn during the winter.....I have been giving my 5 big girls a handful of Black sunflower seeds while they were moulting recently and occasionally toss a handful of scratch on the coop floor. Will this help with putting on weight for winter? Or should I buy some corn to give them at night for warmth? IF so, should it be whole or cracked? Any other supplements I should give them? (besides grit and oystershell available). They haveen getting apples, tomatoes, and whatever other scraps available (watermelon) here and there. Do I need to buy some of this when our garden is done for the winter?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    The scratch I buy has corn in it. But what you're doing right now sounds fine. I do offer more treats (scratch) in the winter than I do the summer, tossing out a handful once in the morning and once in the evening. Mine also get food scraps (although w/an 18 yr old boy at home, there aren't a lot of those [​IMG] ). Chickens don't NEED the greens and other veggies in winter if they're getting formulated feed, but they will love you for them if you're able to provide them. Mine get less in winter, simply because veggies in my area are so much more expensive in winter, but they do get them. Cabbage is a good option that's pretty cheap (I run a coat hanger wire through mine to hang it up like a treat ball) in winter time.
     
  3. Angiebubs

    Angiebubs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Thats what I was hoping...Implanning on buying a big tub of oatmeal and giving them on cold mornings or evenings....but veggies/fruit gets spendy here in the winter as well. Biggest problem I will have is trying to buy stuff for the chickens with my SO around LOL.....cabbage is a good idea though-less expensive and entertaining as well.

    Im excited as they seems to really enjoy the coop right now (about 300 sq ft/total of 15 chickens right now) even when its open for the outside run....so hoping they won't be too bored during the winter.
     
  4. stone_family3

    stone_family3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have found that it is easy to buy produce in the warmer months and freeze it or even buy the frozen bags when they have them on sale $10 for 10. I have rabbits as well and this helps out a lot (they're little piggies). [​IMG]
     
  5. Angiebubs

    Angiebubs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thats a really great idea Stone_family. In fact we have a bunch of those in the freezer right now-wonder if the SO would notice if they were missing? We also have frozen veggies from the garden which I know he would have a fit if those ended up outside. I think Im safest buying some frozen ones myself and declaring it for the chickens though.......I would like to try and do some sprouting in the winter as well....next project to read up on.
     
  6. stone_family3

    stone_family3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Sounds awesome, my girls like herbs so I want to grow some of those for the animals. Though if my head rabbit has it her way those herbs would be all hers. I also like to check out the clearance produce, i know a lot of people say not to freeze greens because they thaw soggy, but I can usually find a 5lbs for about $1.50. I divide them up into freezer baggies birds don't seem to mind.
     
  7. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

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    It's pretty easy to sprout wheat and grow it into wheat grass for them. Once it grows into a grass, it isn't a grain so much as it's a green feed. People with only a few pet chickens can use sprouting wheat from a grocery store. If it's reasonable fresh, a bag sold as animal feed will sprout, too.
     
  8. dragonlair

    dragonlair Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I feed out kibbled cat/kitten food, BOSS, and meat/fat scraps in the winter for added calories to burn for warmth. They also get table scraps, goat milk products and hard boiled eggs when available.
     

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