Feeding my rooster and hens together

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by hulk247, Oct 24, 2014.

  1. hulk247

    hulk247 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2014
    Hello all. My question is do I need to switch up my layer feed to something else when I introduce my little rooster into the coop with all my hens? I am just curious because I have him separated until he is big enough which is almost time. I have been feeding him scratch grains, but feed all of my girls layer feed. Thanks for all the help.
     
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Most breeders do not allow their valuable cockbirds to have access to the high calcium of Layer, as it isn't particularly good for their systems, as non-egg layers. They feed everyone an All Flock or Grower formula type feed, which has SOME calcium, but then, supplement with calcium in a side bowl that females will generally pick at if their bodies are needing the extra calcium.

    Many back yard keepers don't bother with this and just feed Layer and the males eat it.

    It's a choice. It's a decision.


    Edited to add: Scratch grains aren't a complete nutritional formulation. Your young cockerel would be better on Grower. Just sayin'.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2014
  3. hulk247

    hulk247 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2014
    Thanks yea I just have a little bit of scratch grains left, then I am going to switch him to grower. I've only had him a couple of weeks. I think I will go with your suggestion of an all flock feed and just put oyster shell on the side. Thanks for your advice
     
  4. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Holts Summit, Missouri
    I use the equivalent of a flock grower by mixing a higher protein grower diet with scratch grains and supply crushed oyster-shell on the side. Birds appear able to balance their intake by picking out what they need, If mix out of balance relative to birds preference / presumed needs, then component in excess will be residual left by next feeding.
     

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