Feeding My Roosters

JoCoKS

Chirping
May 13, 2019
87
162
88
When I give my small flock treats it seems the rooster cannot pick up the goodies like the hens so I have a small dish I put his goodies in so he can pick at them. Has anyone else noticed this or is it just common with the Bielefelder roosters? My hens can grab the food like crazy but not my big rooster. He gets most of his food from the feeders.
I need your comments on this subject.
Thank you,
Joe
 

LikeTurkeys

Crowing
Jul 25, 2018
1,159
2,252
296
Southern California
Yes, I agree with @nuthatched. In a group when the flock is together, roosters often allow their hens to eat first. If the rooster is alone, he often calls the hen over and sometimes does a "wing dance" (where he lowers his wing around the hen). This is called 'tidbitting'. All three of my grown roosters do it, though when they are just beginning to mature it can take some time for them to learn their manners!
 

Fintechie

Songster
Oct 23, 2019
143
328
137
New York
What do you feed your rooster? I saw somewhere says that rooster doesn’t need calcium like hens do, so they should not take the layers feed. It seems impossible to do.
 

JoCoKS

Chirping
May 13, 2019
87
162
88
I have had pet chickens since I was a child in the late 1950's and early 1960's which were all hens till last year when I hatched two future Bielefelder roosters within 10 minutes of each other. They were best of friends with one definitely being #1 without any problems. I had made the feeder using PVC in the coop so I had very little waste till my future roosters joined the flock and feed was being throwing out every where again so I bought Purina Flock Raiser to feed the roosters. I put the feed in a traditional chicken feeder and the entire flock was all over it so I had to hang it up high so only the roosters could get to the food. That slowed down the food being thrown out of the PVC but did not stop it because the layer feed was the only option in the coop at night so when roosters got hungry the food would fly because they did not want the layer feed. So I research the feed on the Internet and found the layer feed was too much calcium for my new roosters.
 

Fintechie

Songster
Oct 23, 2019
143
328
137
New York
I have had pet chickens since I was a child in the late 1950's and early 1960's which were all hens till last year when I hatched two future Bielefelder roosters within 10 minutes of each other. They were best of friends with one definitely being #1 without any problems. I had made the feeder using PVC in the coop so I had very little waste till my future roosters joined the flock and feed was being throwing out every where again so I bought Purina Flock Raiser to feed the roosters. I put the feed in a traditional chicken feeder and the entire flock was all over it so I had to hang it up high so only the roosters could get to the food. That slowed down the food being thrown out of the PVC but did not stop it because the layer feed was the only option in the coop at night so when roosters got hungry the food would fly because they did not want the layer feed. So I research the feed on the Internet and found the layer feed was too much calcium for my new roosters.
Interesting idea! We have several such PVC feeders and certainly can make one of them high enough just for my roo with flock raiser.

My roo is 8 month old and has been the same feed with his hatch mates- flock raiser and then layers. I don’t see any sign that he dislikes or feels uncomfortable about it so far.

btw- are you sure the food was kicked out by the roo not other critters? I noticed squirrels came to feed while the chickens are out of the coop and they made a mess!
 

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Folly's place

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Sep 13, 2011
24,154
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southern Michigan
Layer feed is meant for hens and pullets who are actively laying eggs, as their only feed. All other chickens; males, chicks, pullets and hens not actually laying eggs right then, should be on a lower calcium diet.
Here we feed an all flock feed, 20% protein, and maintenance levels of calcium, to everyone all year. Then there's a separate feeder with oyster shell for the birds who need it.
Easy! And the additional protein supports molting, growth, and any extra goodies the birds get.
Mary
 

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