female geese question

Discussion in 'Geese' started by sianara, Jul 3, 2011.

  1. sianara

    sianara Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 27, 2007
    Central MA
    I've read alot about the protective/aggressive nature of ganders during mating season but I'm curious if there's just females do they also behave in this way?
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

    63,233
    7,618
    726
    May 3, 2009
    New Jersey
    Some geese become just as aggressive as ganders. In my experience it is an individual thing although breed is also a factor.
     
  3. sianara

    sianara Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 27, 2007
    Central MA
    I really want two female pilgrims but will probably have to get either a pair or two pairs and rehome the ganders (next spring). I was planning to house them with my big ducks but they would have a separate area if necessary. I just want a more realistic idea of their behavior if I go the "pair" route or the two female route for that matter. If I'm going to be dealing with the same aggressiveness in females I might as well get a male and raise some goslings for sale locally the following year...

    eta: I've researched the pilgrims extensively and they seem to be the most "gentle" in nature of the medium weight geese with american buffs close.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2011
  4. goosedragon

    goosedragon Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 28, 2009
    Central NC
    Quote:They might protect their territory but without mating/family it will be much less, the same is true of a gander only flock BTW.
     
  5. Oregon Blues

    Oregon Blues Overrun With Chickens

    5,532
    181
    273
    Apr 14, 2011
    Central Oregon
    If there is no gander to protect the nest, the goose will take over that job.

    In my opinion, the goose is much more fierce, but will protect a very small territory around her nest. The gander will protect a very large area.

    I do not have any problems with my ganders. I do not treat them like lap pets. I expect them to behave with manners at all times, and they do.

    I don't know if a stranger could walk through their pen, but I certainly can, even when the goslings are newly hatched.

    I tell you, though. It isn't a good plan for any dog to get close to the goslings. I don't think I would have geese around small children, because children can't assert themselves as flock leaders and geese can be really scary.
     
  6. Sore Thumb Suburbanite

    Sore Thumb Suburbanite Chillin' With My Peeps

    384
    5
    113
    Apr 26, 2011
    orange county
    Quote:I did the same research/results and got 2 straight run pilgrims both turned out to be male...ugh, so they got rehomed in May; they were abnoxiously loud and very talkative, freaked out when any other people were in the backard and were always trying to assert dominance over eachother, the ducks and me. It was a headache and I nearly didn't order another goose period because of them. But I still really wanted goose eggs so I gave in and ordered a female tolouse because with this breed at least I could ensure the gender was female. I held her a lot and she imprinted on me, she is sweet gentle super quiet and doesn't dominate anybody. SHe talks only to me or when she is confused (she gets stuck in this one area of the yard because she can't see there is a root holding her lower body back from going forward-its kinda funny). SHe is very friendly with everyone who goes near the run and she never cries an alarm. Her honk is very different from the male pilgrims and much shorter and quieter. I love my tolouse and am very happy with her. I really think the goose you get develops according to how you raise it and its interaction with other animals. I now hear My pilgrim boys are the quietest and most friendly to humans in their new flock of 11 geese a few cities away and they stick close to their coop.
     
  7. sianara

    sianara Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 27, 2007
    Central MA
    Quote:They might protect their territory but without mating/family it will be much less, the same is true of a gander only flock BTW.

    Ok, this is what I was hoping to hear [​IMG] Thanks.
     
  8. sianara

    sianara Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 27, 2007
    Central MA
    Quote:So in your experience do they go broody regularly even without a gander (I know my big chickens do!).

    No dogs here due to allergies. Or small children either (not due to allergies [​IMG] but cuz they grew up)
     
  9. sianara

    sianara Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 27, 2007
    Central MA
    Quote:I did the same research/results and got 2 straight run pilgrims both turned out to be male...ugh, so they got rehomed in May; they were abnoxiously loud and very talkative, freaked out when any other people were in the backard and were always trying to assert dominance over eachother, the ducks and me. It was a headache and I nearly didn't order another goose period because of them. But I still really wanted goose eggs so I gave in and ordered a female tolouse because with this breed at least I could ensure the gender was female. I held her a lot and she imprinted on me, she is sweet gentle super quiet and doesn't dominate anybody. SHe talks only to me or when she is confused (she gets stuck in this one area of the yard because she can't see there is a root holding her lower body back from going forward-its kinda funny). SHe is very friendly with everyone who goes near the run and she never cries an alarm. Her honk is very different from the male pilgrims and much shorter and quieter. I love my tolouse and am very happy with her. I really think the goose you get develops according to how you raise it and its interaction with other animals. I now hear My pilgrim boys are the quietest and most friendly to humans in their new flock of 11 geese a few cities away and they stick close to their coop.

    Pilgrims are auto sexing so they would have known they were sending you two males.

    How were you assured of getting a female toulouse?

    I guess the difference in their behavior might be due to now being the lowest in the new pecking order? That's interesting...
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by