Female or male mallard?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by aliceinlove, Oct 5, 2015.

  1. aliceinlove

    aliceinlove Out Of The Brooder

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    My mallards are three months old. One of them is for sure a male. He has almost a full green head and a white ring. He's also getting dark brown chest feathers and a white body. My other mallard kept the female colors untill a few days ago. She started to get lighter colors under the body and is now getting green feathers around her beak. Still no white ring though. I'm so confused. Can females get the green face? I'm not sure if she just maturing way slower than the other one, or if she's gender confused? Lol She also quacks. I'll try to post a pic.
     
  2. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

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    If she quacks like a female then she is a female. Sometimes females can have some male traits like a little green in their face. As long as she's making the female quacking sounds, she's a girl :)
     
  3. needlessjunk

    needlessjunk Chillin' With My Peeps

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  4. cymbaline

    cymbaline Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree with the others - loud quack equals female. I've noticed a greenish-tinge to the black feathers on my girls' heads before. What color are their bills? By that age, yellow-green means male, orange means female.
     
  5. aliceinlove

    aliceinlove Out Of The Brooder

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    That's another confusing thing. She had an orange bill this while time, and now its more yellow black.
     
  6. cymbaline

    cymbaline Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It changes around 10 weeks, give or take, from what I've seen. If it turns yellow, it's a boy.
    Two of my boys were like yours. Same age, but one began getting his colors weeks before the other.
     
  7. lammersadams

    lammersadams New Egg

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    I am new to the group and despite trying I can't figure out how to ask a question.....so I am in the reply section. Sorry

    I have a male duck and five chickens. They are a little family very happy. I feel sorry for my duck....like he needs one of his own kind. Would another male duck be problematic.....not interested in eggs but if you think a female would be best I will do that. I wonder if the chickens would beat up a new duck?
    Should I keep a new duck with my male duck seperate from the chickens for awhile to adjust. I think the bossy chicken might not like that...she loves the male duck. Should I just leave it alone?? Maybe he does not need a duck friend??? Thank you so much
     
  8. cymbaline

    cymbaline Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have never had chickens, only ducks, but I've read that larger drakes can injure chickens while trying to mate with them (wouldn't have really guessed they'd try that, lol), so that's something to take into consideration. I had only two males for about a year and they did fine together; however they were raised together, so yours being different ages and strangers to each other may make a difference.
     
  9. aliceinlove

    aliceinlove Out Of The Brooder

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    They both turned out to be boys. I am worried without a female they might cause some trouble, so I will be rehoming them. I think getting him a female would make him happy.
     
  10. cymbaline

    cymbaline Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My first two were both boys and they got along great. Even now that I have females, most of the boys get along fine (I have one buff drake that is kind of a bully, but the two mallard boys have learned to gang up on him when he starts being a jerk, lol). I think they calm down a bit after the first year or two as well.
     

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