Female turkey with Attitude

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by LucyGoosey1, Aug 17, 2016.

  1. LucyGoosey1

    LucyGoosey1 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 17, 2016
    Hello,

    We have a 6-month old female turkey and are new to raising birds. Our turkey has always been dominant over our other birds (2 chickens, a goose, and 3 ducks). Within the past week she has become more aggressive toward me, displaying her fan and puffing up, making a short warning sound and coming very close, and even pecking.

    How should we best handle this? I've kicked her when she pecked because she was rather scary, but I don't like to.
    Should I
    - just go up to her even when she isn't being aggressive and hold her so she doesn't move, so she gets the message that she can't push us around?
    - grab her neck or head, as I've seen her do to other birds?
    - simply back away from her if I can?
    Or wait to do this until she becomes aggressive again?

    Does she see me as a rival female turkey?
    She tends to become jealous when I or my husband pet the other birds, or maybe she feels that her position as the top bird is threatened by us.

    Hopefully she would also be a good "watch turkey" if ever needed and would come to our defense, since we don't have a dog.

    Thank you for your input from someone more experienced.
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    [​IMG] She is indeed the BOSS and wants to [prove so to you. Kicking at her will only inspire her to fight back. If you can force her firmly to the ground with one hand and force her head to the ground with the other. Hold her there until she stops struggling. If she attacks again when you release her, repeat the process. Don't let her get away with this attitude or it will escalate. Good luck.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. LucyGoosey1

    LucyGoosey1 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 17, 2016
    Thank you for this suggestion. It has been quite helpful, and she is now much better behaved.
     

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