Fermented chick starter

azygous

Crossing the Road
10 Years
Dec 11, 2009
18,182
21,758
912
Colorado Rockies
I feed my new chicks fermented feed from the beginning and they really love it. I also do not bother with chick starter.

Years ago, a broody was sitting on eggs that were about to hatch so I ran down to the feed store to pick up some chick starter. Out of curiosity, I compared the ingredients label with the Flock Raiser shelved nearby. I had had a hunch and it was correct - the two were identical except the chick starter had a tiny bit less protein.

So when my chicks come in, I just dip into the same feed bucket that the big chickens eat from.

Fermented feed, besides providing natural probiotics and enhanced nutrients, also assure baby chicks are getting fluids continually as the FF is wet. By the way, I mix it so it's on the dry side so chicks can't drown in it. But I also put it in tiny cups they can't climb into.

This is a good insurance policy against baby chicks getting clogged crops and gizzards from not drinking as much as they should. They still need fresh water to drink, but FF assures they get it in their food, too.
 

Glk

Chirping
Jan 24, 2020
40
222
50
North Western Pa
I feed my new chicks fermented feed from the beginning and they really love it. I also do not bother with chick starter.

Years ago, a broody was sitting on eggs that were about to hatch so I ran down to the feed store to pick up some chick starter. Out of curiosity, I compared the ingredients label with the Flock Raiser shelved nearby. I had had a hunch and it was correct - the two were identical except the chick starter had a tiny bit less protein.

So when my chicks come in, I just dip into the same feed bucket that the big chickens eat from.

Fermented feed, besides providing natural probiotics and enhanced nutrients, also assure baby chicks are getting fluids continually as the FF is wet. By the way, I mix it so it's on the dry side so chicks can't drown in it. But I also put it in tiny cups they can't climb into.

This is a good insurance policy against baby chicks getting clogged crops and gizzards from not drinking as much as they should. They still need fresh water to drink, but FF assures they get it in their food, too.
Hadn't considered the extra hydration aspect.. also wasn't aware of that slight of a difference between the two feeds.. thanks for the info
 

Cooba

Chirping
Jan 29, 2020
63
92
50
Jordan, Ontario, Canada
I feed my new chicks fermented feed from the beginning and they really love it. I also do not bother with chick starter.

Years ago, a broody was sitting on eggs that were about to hatch so I ran down to the feed store to pick up some chick starter. Out of curiosity, I compared the ingredients label with the Flock Raiser shelved nearby. I had had a hunch and it was correct - the two were identical except the chick starter had a tiny bit less protein.

So when my chicks come in, I just dip into the same feed bucket that the big chickens eat from.

Fermented feed, besides providing natural probiotics and enhanced nutrients, also assure baby chicks are getting fluids continually as the FF is wet. By the way, I mix it so it's on the dry side so chicks can't drown in it. But I also put it in tiny cups they can't climb into.

This is a good insurance policy against baby chicks getting clogged crops and gizzards from not drinking as much as they should. They still need fresh water to drink, but FF assures they get it in their food, too.
They do the exact same thing with dog food kibble! Having 4 dogs I read and compare labels. For dog food they get approval for one recipe and then just change what they call it on the bag to suit the purchaser. They may tweak it by putting in more glucosamine/chondroitin for the older dog but in some instances everything is identical!
 

Glk

Chirping
Jan 24, 2020
40
222
50
North Western Pa
They do the exact same thing with dog food kibble! Having 4 dogs I read and compare labels. For dog food they get approval for one recipe and then just change what they call it on the bag to suit the purchaser. They may tweak it by putting in more glucosamine/chondroitin for the older dog but in some instances everything is identical!
Very interesting. I will be checking out labels more closely. Thanks again for the useful information !
 

azygous

Crossing the Road
10 Years
Dec 11, 2009
18,182
21,758
912
Colorado Rockies
I don't bother with medicated chick feed, either. It's all marketing to try to sell people more products than they really need.

In order to provide the same benefit to my chicks that medicated feed provides, I dig up a clump of grass with soil attached to the roots and I give it to my baby chicks to play with during their first two weeks. As the chicks consume the soil and grass, there are microbes in them that will immunize the chicks during this brief window when their immune systems are developing.

I also brood my chicks on the same sand bedding in the run that the adult flock has been on. This further immunizes them against pathogens. Been doing this for years, and my chickens often live quite lengthy lives.
 

Cooba

Chirping
Jan 29, 2020
63
92
50
Jordan, Ontario, Canada
I don't bother with medicated chick feed, either. It's all marketing to try to sell people more products than they really need.

In order to provide the same benefit to my chicks that medicated feed provides, I dig up a clump of grass with soil attached to the roots and I give it to my baby chicks to play with during their first two weeks. As the chicks consume the soil and grass, there are microbes in them that will immunize the chicks during this brief window when their immune systems are developing.

I also brood my chicks on the same sand bedding in the run that the adult flock has been on. This further immunizes them against pathogens. Been doing this for years, and my chickens often live quite lengthy lives.
Yes....last years Natural Dog conference had a speaker that recommended feeding your dog dirt to help with allergies.....I was going to go to one of my fields that appears to have good soil and try it on my one shepherd that is always itchy.
 

Glk

Chirping
Jan 24, 2020
40
222
50
North Western Pa
I don't bother with medicated chick feed, either. It's all marketing to try to sell people more products than they really need.

In order to provide the same benefit to my chicks that medicated feed provides, I dig up a clump of grass with soil attached to the roots and I give it to my baby chicks to play with during their first two weeks. As the chicks consume the soil and grass, there are microbes in them that will immunize the chicks during this brief window when their immune systems are developing.

I also brood my chicks on the same sand bedding in the run that the adult flock has been on. This further immunizes them against pathogens. Been doing this for years, and my chickens often live quite lengthy lives.
I've read that and had another member tell me the same thing. I will be doing that also. My chicks are due to arrive in another week or so and trying to get all my ducks in a row before then
 
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