fermented lay pellets, getting slimy

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by ccabal, Mar 30, 2014.

  1. ccabal

    ccabal Chirping

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    I've been fermenting some lay pellets for a few months now, but recently I've noticed the consistency of the mash has changed. It was more watery before, and I used to be able to use a regular kitchen strainer to scoop it out. But now its gotten really slimy. The slime is so thick that the strainer doesn't help at all. I can't separate the slime from the mash, and now its just a gross slimy mash. I still feed it to the chickens, and they eat it, but I am concerned if this is OK, or has the fermenting gone bad?
    Anyone experience this before?
    I noticed this started happening when I started mixing in some hen scratch into the fermentation batch. Don't know if that's coincidence or not.
    But I've since worked through the hen scratch, and all I have in there fermenting is lay pellet.


    -Christian
     
  2. ccabal

    ccabal Chirping

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    so no one's had this happen? Maybe I should just start over.
     
  3. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Crowing

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    If you used a well formulated feed and fed it dry as a base diet you wouldn't have that problem. Supplementing water with vitamins and probiotics, adding a digestible animal protein like casein every so often, greatly lowers the risk of enteritis.
     
  4. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress

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    If I thought there was a problem with my feed, I would not use it until I knew for sure. I'd hate my chickens to get sick or die from slimy food.
     
  5. ccabal

    ccabal Chirping

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    Im confused by both of the replies above.... I'm talking about "FERMENTED" feed, not regular lay pellets. My pellets that I used for fermenting are the same old pellets I've always used...nothing wrong with the pellets.
    And who said anything about enteritis?
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2014
  6. ten chicks

    ten chicks Songster

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    If concerned dump it(the fact that you are questioning it,tells me you suspect something is wrong,go with your instincts)and start a new batch.I do ferment feed,but only do mine in small batches(i personally do not like leaving it longer than a week,but again my opinion) and make a new batch weekly,mainly b/c the only birds that really like fermented feed are my two big roosters,the hens not so much. All my birds have access to dry crumbles all day,and fermented is given only in the morning. You will find conflicting information regarding fermenting as everyone has their own opinion. I have even read posts that some giving FF with mold in it,i personally would never feed moldy feed to any animal,the risk is just too great.
     
  7. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Crowing

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    Years ago there was a trend of soaking oats to make them "easily digestible" for poultry. It wasn't true since many found that by doing that, their birds regularly had diarrhea. If you think about it, the fermentation process is the result of bacterial action, so anything that is fermented is a perfect environment for bacteria and germs to grow. Not the good ones like lactic acid bacteria either. When the intestinal tract becomes irritated, enteritis ensues, among other problems. You had a concern about "slimy" food as a result of fermenting feed, so it would seem logical to stop doing that. Especially with the amount of people, many who've posted in the Emergencies & Diseases section of the forum, having problems as a result of fermenting their feed.
     
  8. ccabal

    ccabal Chirping

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    That's interesting. I had only read posts about the benefits of fermenting, but have not read about the problem it might cause.
    My chickens have not shown any problems yet, but I think I might just start a new batch from scratch. ( I had been saving the "juice" from the previous batch to start new ones , but now that the juice has become very thick slime,I think I better start totally new ).
     
  9. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress

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    I prefer to give mine a bit of wine rather than FF. They wolf it down
     
  10. pdirt

    pdirt Songster

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    If you don't already have some pH test paper, get some, it's cheap. I use one ranged from 2.9-5.2, which is ideal for lactofermention purposes, but anything that works in that general range will work. You want the pH to be 4.5 or lower. The lower the pH (the more acidic), the more "bad" bacteria cannot survive...and the more the lactobacillus bacteria can. There's a good chance that your ff has simply developed a new characteristic. Testing pH will tell you a lot. Bacillus subtilis is a common soil bacteria (and found on wheat and rice straw, among other sources) that can produce slime. But it's one of the good bacteria and is fine to eat. The Japanese ferment called natto is one example of this. No way of telling if that is what is growing in your ff, but pH will tell you more.

    You might simply want to start new batch in a new bucket, but don't toss the slimy stuff, keep it covered. When you get your pH test paper, if the pH is 4.5 or lower, you could then keep feeding it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2014
    1 person likes this.

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