Fertile eggs and eating them

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Summer98, Dec 4, 2011.

  1. Summer98

    Summer98 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is a dumb question, but I am new. I know you can eat eggs that have been fertilized, but how do you know if they are? When I crack an egg open to cook it, will it look or taste any different? Do you shine the light and do the candling to look through it? Is it possible to crack an egg open and discover an embryo growing?
     
  2. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    There is no difference in taste or nutrition between non-fertile and fertile eggs. When you crack 'em open, the white spot that is normally on the yolk will look just like a little bulls-eyes, with a dot in the center, if the egg is fertile.

    The ONLY time you would find an embryo developing in an egg is if it has been incubated for a couple of weeks, either in an incubator or by a broody hen who has sat on the eggs incubating them 24/7 for a couple of weeks. There is NO development until an egg is incubated, and then it takes around 5 days before you see anything at all like veins starting.

    Most chickens lay their eggs and leave the nest. Eggs require a broody hen to stay on 'em to start developing. If you have chickens, and a rooster with the hens, just gather the eggs daily.
     
  3. cmom

    cmom Hilltop Farm

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    Quote:I agree.

    Infertile egg.
    [​IMG]

    Fertile egg.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. abbylane35

    abbylane35 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No, the eggs don't taste any different. You can tell they are fertilized a couple of ways...there could be a blood spot on the yolk, or there may be a small "ring" on the yolk of the egg. Generally if you are collecting your eggs daily, you won't have a problem with finding a developing embryo...if you forget for a few days or have a broody hen, you might find an embi. Hope this answers your questions![​IMG]
     
  5. abbylane35

    abbylane35 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    wow! you guys are fast!
     
  6. GreenGoddess

    GreenGoddess Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 6, 2009
    St Pauls, NC
    Quote:A blood spot or meat spot on the yolk or anywhere else in the egg does not mean it is fertilized.. This is an "oops" in the egg making process of the pullet/hen and can be caused by a number of factors including but not limited to illness or stress... [​IMG]

    Goddess [​IMG]
     
  7. cmom

    cmom Hilltop Farm

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    I agree. I eat my fertile eggs. I have customers who want fertile eggs to eat. I collect the eggs daily, sort the eggs and put them in cartons and into my egg cooler. Eggs with a visible blood or meat spot on the yolk or in the whites are safe for consumption. The spot can be removed with the tip of a knife. Blood or "meat" spots are occasionally found in eggs. These tiny spots are not harmful and are caused by the rupture of a blood vessel during formation of the egg. Blood spots do not indicate a fertilized egg. These eggs are safe to eat. I eat them with no problem.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2011
  8. Summer98

    Summer98 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks so much for quick responses. Great pictures to illustrate.
     
  9. cmom

    cmom Hilltop Farm

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    The Pics are from Speckeledhen.
     
  10. Knock Kneed Hen

    Knock Kneed Hen California Dream'in Chickens

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    Somewhere I read that fertile eggs have less cholesterol.. . . [​IMG]
     

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