fertile eggs?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by beverly evans, Oct 24, 2013.

  1. beverly evans

    beverly evans Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi out there. Does anyone know when an egg ceases to be viable? I mean after the hen lays it, how many days will it continue to be capable of germinating before it is either put under a broody hen or into an incubator? All I know is to keep them at ambient temperature ??? : ).
     
  2. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    Eggs stay viable longer at cooler temperatures. Keeping them at room temp degrades them very fast. Some people use the refig if they live in FL, others use a damp basement that is cool. Mine is 59 degrees and 90% humidity right now at the end of summer, and soon to cool down to 45.

    Eggs need to be turned at least 2-3 times adayuntil you set them.

    Best hatching rates are acheived before 7 days. After that the % hatch decreases day by day. IT is possible to have very old eggs hatch, but the % will be low.

    ONe person I know can hold eggs for a very long time at cold temps, carefullly packed in a special way for over a month as I recall. Again, requires special method.

    THe worst hatch I ever had was buying eggs from someone that left the eggs on the counter the whole week before I picked them up. I have had shipped eggs hatch with better hatch%.

    Keep them cool 45-55 and in 75% humidity, and for best results set by 7 days old. BUt if you need those hatchlings, set them whenever you can, even if very old.
     
  3. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    double post
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2013
  4. beverly evans

    beverly evans Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh dear, that is almost frig temp! My eggs must be all ruined! I guess I should keep them outside. This is central Texas and we have 80 degrees right now, but near the ground it is cooler. I wish I'd asked sooner. THX.
     
  5. beverly evans

    beverly evans Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 18, 2013
    Thanks so much for your input. If I had known they were so fragile I would have bit the bullet and bought an incubator. I just have these gorgeous roosters that I have to get rid of and suddenly thought why not hatch some of the fertilized eggs? No preparation! I took 8 to a friend in the neighborhood in the 3 day period they had been laid but I didn't know to turn them or about temp. and humidity. They may not hatch either. I have a friend coming as I said on the 29th, maybe he'll only get the last ones, that is just hatched. I have put the six I have on the garage floor where it is about 55 degrees and put a wet paper towel in with them. Should I put them in the frig? What to do? My frig has a thermostat but I haven't a clue what the temps. are, only that I can turn it much warmer. Get out all the thermometers, I guess. : )
     
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    This Texas A&M site gives a lot of information about storing eggs for incubation.

    Texas A&M Incubation site
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/...e-Cartwright-Incubating-and-hatching-eggs.pdf

    These are guidelines, not absolute hard and fast laws of nature. These are intended to help improve your chances for a good hatch. If you follow them exactly you are not guaranteed a good hatch. If you violate some of them you are not guaranteed a lousy hatch. Nature doesn’t work that way. Many of us violate some of these and still get good hatches.

    Take the temperature for example. The perfect temperature for storage is around 55 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit. I don’t have any place like that. Neither does a hen when she is laying eggs to hatch. The further they are form that ideal temperature and longer they are far away the less your odds are, but that doesn’t mean they won’t hatch. It just means your odds are not as great. I just keep mine at room temperature. It’s the best I can do so that’s what I do. Most of my hatches are pretty good.

    If you store eggs halfway reasonably, you don’t even need to turn them the first week and they are really likely to hatch. The closer to ideal conditions you store them, the longer you can store them. If you store them close to the right temperature and humidity and turn them after that first week, there is not much of a drop-off for two weeks. After two weeks, there is a decent drop-off in hatchability. That still does not mean that none will hatch, just that the odds of a great hatch start going down.

    Don’t panic. Just do the best you can with the conditions you have. It will probably be pretty good.
     
  7. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    I don't think the hens read the rule book, so take heart. GO with what you have, and enjoy the outcome. Just know for next time. [​IMG] I have checked my frig for temp as actual temps vary a lot. THe top of my frig will freeze my lettuce, lol. I have lots of thermomters around since I started i ncubating eggs.

    THis is supposed to be fun. Live and learn.
     

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