Fertilizer Suggestions

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by DaviJones, Jan 18, 2018.

  1. DaviJones

    DaviJones Songster

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    So I wouldn't say I'm exactly new to gardening but this is the first year I'm going to actually try, for lack of a better word. I'm going to start preparing the soil sometime soon because I'm in zone 11a, and wanted to ask about ideal fertilization.

    I'm planning on utilizing all my chicken manure, does it supply all the needed nutrients for most plants? If not, what fertilizer would you recommend?

    Sorry I forgot to mention that soil is very sandy. Oh and if you have any questions that factor in don't be afraid to ask! Thank you in advance!
     
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  2. azygous

    azygous Free Ranging

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    I have lots of chicken poop. I have tried to use it on my vegetable gardens with mixed results. Some veggies love the high nitrogen, and others simply languish in it. Part of the problem with composting chicken manure in arid climates such as yours and mine is lack of moisture to aid in the timely breakdown of the manure in order for it to have the proper balance of nutrients. The effect of low moisture is that it only partially decomposes and it's too high in nitrogen even after a year or more.

    Therefore, what I have resorted to is spreading the chicken manure on the grassy areas and using horse manure for the vegetable gardens.

    Others will have different experiences with it, but do consider your composting conditions as compared to theirs as you read about their rave reviews.
     
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  3. pintail_drake2004

    pintail_drake2004 Songster

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    Instead of guessing what to put on the garden, do a soil test. They are cheap and lay out exactly how much of what nutrient you need to add to your garden. after you get your soil amended the 1st time, it is easier to keep it there.
     
  4. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    I like to use compost... if you don't have your own, you can get by the yard at lost of places that sell other rocks, bark, and that type of stuff. I have used my trailer and also just had it brought on a dump truck.

    I just mix 50/50 if my soil seems poor. Or 30/70 if it seem decent. In subsequent seasons I top dress with it. I also have sandy soil.

    But the other suggestions to get tested are probably better. That's just the way I've always done it.

    Good luck, it's a very rewarding adventure. :drool
     
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  5. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

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    Agreed with PP that a soil test is the first order of business. After that, I would amend as suggested by soil test. I would not use chicken poo straight up. It's too hot. I do DLM in coop and run, therefore have loads of finished compost available all the time. Compost is much better as a soil amendment b/c the nutrients are much more apt to be in good balance.

    With sandy soil, you WILL have to add fertilizer throughout the gardening season. Even in my sandy loam garden, I add fertilizer throughout the gardening season as crop needs indicate.
     
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  6. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    I remembered... just because truck loads are economical doesn't mean it's convenient. They also sell compost in manageable bag sizes in the garden department at most places.

    Reading my previous post...
    How many times have I heard that and KNOWN it was completely wrong! :hmm This is NO different! :oops: :smack

    One thing I learned is chicken poo ISN'T gardening gold. I have enough birds it benefits me to remove most waste and use a little here or there. So far never enough to burn anything. But I do feel as though it's lacking plenty of other mineral type nutrients that it isn't a complete fertilizer.

    But sometimes the nutrients needed depend greatly on the plant. Some actually prefer poor soil while most will (probably) thrive in a richer soil.

    Yes, one of the issues with sandy soil is that it needs to be moist for the plant to uptake nutrients and it dries our fairly fast. Well I don't water regularly enough, really.

    But hey... playing in the dirt! :wee It does a body good. :bun My suggestion... plant enough for you and the uninvited insect/bird guests, so there's plenty to go around. :drool
     
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  7. DaviJones

    DaviJones Songster

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    Sorry, long time, no post! So I see the general consensus is a no, so I'll start scouting out compost or soil testing services. Should I just throw the manure out or could I use it for anything? Recommendations on compost brands? Thanks for all your help!

    "But hey... playing in the dirt! :wee It does a body good. :bun My suggestion... plant enough for you and the uninvited insect/bird guests, so there's plenty to go around. :drool" Yeah, I really enjoy it until I don't wake up early to water and have to be out in the 115 degrees Sun!
     
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  8. Percheron chick

    Percheron chick Crowing

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    I would spread it on the garden, turn everything under and start planting in 2-3 weeks. Start a compost pile near your garden that you place the new chicken manure, weeds, yard and kitchen waste in for next year's garden. Throw it out? You're killing me.
     
  9. DaviJones

    DaviJones Songster

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    I know I hate to waste it! But I have a feeling it won't break down.
     
  10. Percheron chick

    Percheron chick Crowing

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    Is it mostly shavings and straw?
     

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