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Fertiziled Eggs and Baby chicks

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by boisblancboy, Feb 19, 2013.

  1. boisblancboy

    boisblancboy Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 18, 2013
    Down the road I would like to get some of my own baby chicks and would like to know what to do to make that happen? I have done a lot of searching but cant seem to find any real details as what to watch for. Knowing when the hens are laying on fertilized eggs, how long they take to hatch, etc etc. Thanks in advance!

    Brandon
     
  2. boisblancboy

    boisblancboy Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 18, 2013
    Wow anyone?
     
  3. PSJ

    PSJ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Do you want a hen to hatch them or do you plan on using a 'bator?
     
  4. PSJ

    PSJ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There is also an "incubating and hatching eggs" forum that I'm sure would be a ton of help
     
  5. chickathon

    chickathon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 12, 2011
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    In my opinion and I have been only raising chickens for a couple of years. Is that you let your chickens insticts take over.You could use dummy eggs or if you have only hens then when the temp outside stays about 52 degrees let their eggs build up to about eleven and when they take a notion they will get broody. You could buy some fertelized eggs and do a switch with the unfertle ones. But, if you have a roo all you have to do is let nature take it's course. I had a hen who went broody on a dummy egg. and wouldn't leave. It all depends on what breed of chickens you have. All are not of a broody nature. Red sex links were bred for egg production so the broodiness was bred out of them. That is something that you will have to research. Egg that are fertalized will have a little white "bullseye" on the yolk. Eggs take 21 days give or take to hatch. That is chickens Guineas and pheasents take longer. Hope this helps and[​IMG].
     
  6. boisblancboy

    boisblancboy Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 18, 2013
    Well, I guess I don't know whether I want to hen to hatch them or use a bator. I'm sure there are pros and cons to each but I'm yet so new to this whole thing I don't know any of them. Any advice?
     
  7. PSJ

    PSJ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There is a little work involved in incubating them... Temp, humidity, etc. If you don't have a broody hen, you could incubate them. The hatching & incubating eggs forum is FULL of useful info!
     
  8. Arkansas81

    Arkansas81 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 26, 2012
    Central Arkansas
    Brandon,
    If you want a broody then you need to get a breed that is prone to do that-silkie, banties, etc. NOW getting those breeds there is no guarentee that they will do that. You can do both methods-bator and broody.

    With a bator it does take some practice and patience-but it is so much fun! It is also very rewarding to watch a broody do her thing, but need to make sure her being out of commission doesn't hurt your egg production. Also if you have a broody you need to take some things into consideration....can she stay inside the coop with the others, make sure you mark the eggs you want to hatch otherwise you will get a staggered hatch and the momma will stay on the nest to wait on all to hatch and won't take care of the others. When they do hatch do you have a seperate spot for them, being with momma she should protect them but the babies need chick food not layer or hen food-can't swallow and to much calcium will hurt their kidney's, etc. With a bator you will be able to have a 'hands on" experience as much as you want, but without a "momma" to take care of them then they will need a brooder.

    So all in all it is very rewarding to let a broody do all the work or if you do a bator experience. It is a wonderful learning experience for all involved, and soon you will be addicted! My daughter just loves the entire experience, we do both methods. I am very glad I've let her have this experience she gets so much out of it. So do lots of research and lurk around on the site and you will be an ol pro just like the rest of us. Maybe make a list of what you are really wanting to get involved with. Plus go ask around and see what others in your area are looking for so if you decide to sell eggs/chicks/started fowl you can get an idea of what you will be able to do locally. You can ship from your post office but that can get very expensive-quickly!!!

    There should be a thread on your local area of people that just get on to stay in touch with the locals and to sell chicks/eggs,etc. Look under 'where am i, where are you?" forum. That can be a very nice link to follow up on so you can meet and get to know ppl in your area. Also look on fb, there might be locals from your area on there too. Keep searching and learning-well worth the time!! Good luck!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  9. boisblancboy

    boisblancboy Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 18, 2013
    Wow awesome thanks so much for all the information everyone! Like I said its goin to be awhile before I even attempt it. First I need to get my coop, then chicks, and finally eggs. Once I get a solid handle on all that I might venture to raise some from eggs of my own! Thanks!
     

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