Fighting female dogs

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by 4 luv of eggs, Aug 28, 2010.

  1. 4 luv of eggs

    4 luv of eggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 22, 2010
    Westminster, MD
    I have an issue that I don't think anyone will really be able to help me with but I thought I'd try. First off I'd like to say that I won't be re-homing any of these two since they are family members and are 10 and 5 years old. I have put up with this situation since before I got the 5 year old. Anyway, a little background:

    My two Corgis, Mina and Bits have each been with me since they were 8 weeks old. Mina will be 10 and...well...seems a little special needs. There is something not quite right about her, even as a pup. She even would fight with my first Corgi (gone now for five years) so when Bits came along, I had already been through several dog fights. Bits can be a little timid of new things and people but very affectionate. They are both my dogs and follow me everywhere. I very rarely go to the bathroom by myself since they feel I need to be herded there in case I get lost. The fights though are another thing.

    These have never taken place when no-one is around. If they did I'm sure Bits would be dead. Triggers seem to be food, toys and affection. Sometimes though, we have no idea what started it. It's extremely hard to say who starts it because there is no posturing, only Bits will growl and by that time you can't intervene because it is on.

    It had been a year with no altercations so I thought with age came wisdom and that was all behind us now. At my granddaughter's birthday, my unknowing Brother-in-Law put his plate down on the ground for them to lick. I understood that one but everyone at the party was traumatized. It isn't pretty to watch and they don't stop unless they are broken up. One month later on the 4th of July, I was calling them to come in and Mina came running at Bits and T-boned her, bowling her over. The only thing is I was the only one around and could not get them to break. I had to stand there and watch it to the finish as Mina held Bits down in a throat hold. They were both bloodied.

    Yesterday we had another one happen. My mud room has one of those bristle mats and hiding on it were some crumbs of chicken breading that one of the children must have dropped. It blended in perfectly. I had no idea until later what had triggered it. We were coming in from first outing of the morning and I wasn't quite awake yet. It was another brutal battle. My daughter finally heard me screaming and came from her side of the house and we broke them up. Bits has a torn ear and it looks like under her eye was scratched. The whites of her one eye is bloodshot.

    What bother me is that after they have been broken up, Mina acts like nothing happened and will sit with the biggest Corgi smile on her face, like it was such good fun. Bits will sulk off to lick her wounds. They are both fine today as is usually the case. They will sniff each other's wounds and go about their day like nothing happened. Except for these outbursts, they get along great. Even yesterday when I had Mina on the back porch to separate them, Bits would not leave the door. She sat as close to Mina on the other side of the screen as possible. These dogs have never intentionally bitten a person either or they would be history.

    I'm sorry this is so long and thank anyone who read it through. Is there anyone who could offer advise?
     
  2. Tuffoldhen

    Tuffoldhen Flock Mistress

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    I have no answers to the problem but I have heard and do know that females will fight lots more than males or male to females do. Good luck!!!
     
  3. Avla

    Avla Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 5, 2010
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    Are they spayed?
    Usually hormones get the best of females.
     
  4. SpringChickens

    SpringChickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 1, 2009
    College Station, Tx
    I don't know either, but I would strongly suggest taking them to a trainer.

    I taught both of my dogs the command "leave it", and they know it well - I can put food under their nose and tell them "leave it" and they won't touch it. I mention this because one of my dogs used to fight with my dad's dog when we came home to visit - I would just tell her "leave it' and she would back down.

    Good luck with this.
     
  5. 4 luv of eggs

    4 luv of eggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 22, 2010
    Westminster, MD
    Alva, yes they are both spayed. Mina was spayed at 6 months and Bits at about 1 year.

    Tuffoldhen, I've heard the same thing and believe me it is true. They don't posture like male dogs do either, they just go at it.

    SpringChickens, They do understand "leave it" and will not steal food but when there is "found booty" is another thing. Once the fight starts they hear nothing. I guess it's just the unpredictablity of the whole thing.

    Thanks everyone for your responses.
     
  6. cheri222

    cheri222 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 12, 2010
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    We have the same problem, but our female is 2yr old and our male is 14yr old. I finally went to the vet after I got bit. Neither of my dogs is a biter, but my then 4 yr old was way too close to the fight and I tried to grab him and stuck my arm inbetween them and ended up with a bite and fx of the wrist. The vet says it's a alpha female thing. She now has a gentle leader on and it reduces the occurances greatly. We are to always pay atten to her first. Yes she is fixed and so is he. The big problem is now that she bit, no one will take her. She would be a great dog in a home with only one dog. Try the vet or look up alpha dog for some better ideas. The best lesson I learned is never use your hand to try and break up the fight. Good luck
     
  7. Slinkytoys

    Slinkytoys Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 22, 2009
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    I've experienced this behavior in Corgis. The only thing that has worked has been to muzzle the aggressor. You will end up with one dead and the other mauled if you don't rehome one. Muzzles can be very safe, there are several styles, if used as directed.
    Corgi are very smart and strong dogs. You are lucky that you have been able to separate them, I've seen broomsticks broken when used to pry open their jaws (unsuccessfully I might add). Actually the way your dog acts is similar to Rage syndrome. The dog acts as if nothing happened, they seem to go into a daze while in the throes of aggression.
    Good Luck,
    Slinky
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2010
  8. Avla

    Avla Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was about to mention rage syndrome to, I would talk to your vet about it.
     
  9. FireTigeris

    FireTigeris Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

    Um, ...good luck. That would terrify me.
     
  10. weimarmama

    weimarmama Overrun With Chickens

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    Jun 4, 2010
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    My Coop
    Females do tend to be very bad about aggression, but dogs are also more likely to be aggressive towards each other if they're of the same gender. And especially if they're both at least 12-18 mos old. A yr ago we only had 2 weimaraners (our 2 boys Hunter & Remy) & we decided to take in 2 more that needed a home (a female puppy & a male named Mully). Hunter, at the time, was almost 3 yrs old & Mully was 18 mos old. From the very start he & Hunter did not get along. We had never had any serious problems with Hunter & aggression. We didn't allow them to be together unsupervised, Mully had the run of the house in the daytime while Hunter was in the backyard but slept in his crate at night, we took everything very slowly, & we tried to always be as calm as possible. We even took them on walks together (both of them leashed, of course).

    We only had Mully for about 6 wks, when they had their last fight. I had just brought Hunter in from the backyard. Mully saw him, went crazy, & somehow broke out of the crate. It was a bad fight & I was by myself. Thankfully, less than a couple of minutes after it started my mother came in & together we were able to break the fight up. After that I happened to look down & noticed that my hand was completely covered in blood. My mother took me to the emergency room where we spent the rest of the night. It took a couple of months, but my hand has since healed with just a few scars. I'll admit that it does still occassionally ache. Amazingly enough, neither Hunter or Mully had a single scratch on them.

    Mully went to live with my DF's parents after that fight. He's the only dog there & loves it. They call him their "other son", so I think it's the best possible home for him. We make sure to keep an eye on Hunter, now, & go very slowly when introducing a new dog to him. We added another female weim last year & recently a standard poodle female puppy that we co-own with my mother. Thankfully, we haven't had any problems with them. But we don't allow the girls to go in the backyard with Hunter, he eats his food in the bedroom separated from everyone else, & we never leave them unsupervised. And we have no plans to take in anymore older dogs or anymore males.

    Your veterinarian will probably be able to help you, & it wouldn't hurt to try a trainer, too. I read an article once about dominance aggression. It's one of the more common forms of aggression & the aggression tends to happen all of a sudden with no warning. Studies have shown that dogs with dominance aggression have low serotonin levels & there are medications that increase them.

    I was always very careful about breaking the fights up. I never put my hands close to their mouths & I always grabbed them towards the back like your supposed to, but I still ended up being bitten. It's so easy to be injured during a fight, so be very safe.
     

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