Fighting young chickens

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by MyFeatheredGirl, Nov 20, 2016.

  1. MyFeatheredGirl

    MyFeatheredGirl Out Of The Brooder

    14
    2
    26
    Jun 11, 2013
    I have some baby chickens (about 10 weeks old) there are 4 with one mother. I am not sure about sex yet. I have seen some normal pecking but yesterday one of the chickens start chasing and pecking it's sibling. It pecking it so hard it was cut and bleeding right under the eye ball. I took the injured one inside, cleaned it's wound and kept it here over night to let it heal. The other chicken was relentless and keep chasing this poor baby so it was hiding. The mother saw it but didn't seem to care. what should I do? They free range and have a whole barn, food and water so space etc... not an issue. There has been no change since they were hatched, no new stress. Why is this baby being mean?
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

    17,229
    5,139
    476
    Jul 16, 2015
    central Wisconsin
    Could be a young rooster. I had one about that age that was attacking a sick hen. So perhaps the pecked one was acting odd. Have you noticed any abnormal behavior out of it? I probably would remove the aggressive one, either temporarily or permanently.
     
  3. silkielover88

    silkielover88 Chillin' With My Peeps

    270
    10
    93
    Apr 21, 2014
    Addison NY
    I'd guess it's a young rooster. What's the parents behavior like? I noticed the silkies we get from TS, the males are very aggressive at a young age. We hatched a few egg from a pair from there and the chicks would spur at your hands and just a few days old. We eventually gave them all away that were like that.
     
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

    34,557
    7,767
    596
    Nov 27, 2012
    SW Michigan
    My Coop
    Are these your only birds?
    I'd isolate the aggressive one, not the injured one.
    Wonders if mama is weaning them, 10 weeks is pretty old for broody to still be mothering them, so they are establishing a pecking order amongst themselves.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by