Final Pathological Diagnosis (long)

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ivan3, Aug 1, 2008.

  1. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Our biggest Slate tom died suddenly back on 7/22. He was out following Cass around in the morning, struttin' and buttin' and was dead before midnight. I'm posting this today as I just received the results of the necroscopy. I'm posting the actual report and my `cover' letter that I delivered with poor Boris (a fine yard comrade). We can only guess that the heavy rain here had something to do with this (he liked to sleep on the ground just outside the shed door to be closer to the fan). The pig ova-wild birds? No hogs in a half-a-mile radius. Anyway, this might be interesting to some of you: Pulmonary E. Coli. signs&symptoms.
    DCM is Dilated Cardiac Myopathy. Boris was a third again as big as our other Slate tom and we always worried his ticker might not take it.

    (apologies for formatting, just twisted all the `water' out of the PDF and shrink wrapped it)
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    ed: for lugnut linkage
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2008
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    That's really interesting, John. Sorry you lost Boris. Bummer. They do seem to hide their illnesses and injuries as much as they can-perhaps it's that prey animal thing of never letting a predator see you're vulnerable. Anyway, it's always good to know what happened, I think.
     
  3. chickiebaby

    chickiebaby Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 2, 2008
    western mass
    so sorry to hear it.
     
  4. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    E-coli infections are usually acquired during hatch from a dirty incubator or dirty eggs.

    The organism is inhaled into the lungs and becomes a problem when the bird is stressed. You need to watch your other birds carefully.
     
  5. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Cyn, thanks, he was a good fella and lived a good life. It was the fact that he was his happy old self (not the least bit stressed - unless one considers the weather), hanging out with Cass as she picked tomatoes around noon, and dead by 11 that night that caused me the most concern.

    I'm guessing that as the boys like to be out in the rain when it's hot the splashing rain in the run might have led to a transfer - the shed bedding is raked and replaced, and the run is raked religiously (except when it has been pouring - I'm thinking around 7" for last month, alone). All other variables have been constant over the past three yrs.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2008
  6. thecityman

    thecityman Out Of The Brooder

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    Ivan-

    First, you have to explain to me the violin/needle comment??

    Second, I just wanted to say I really enjoyed those links. Reading that autopsy (necropsy) report was very interesting. As were the photos of that growth. Now, I love my turkeys WAY more than most people, but I'm sure I'd be willing to be the very high vet bill that I'm guessing went along with having the surgery shown in those photos. But Kudos for those who would (and did). Btw, just you know for future reference, my turkeys are eastern wilds that I hatched after mom and most of the eggs in a nest were ran over by a bush hog. I understand that is controversial but know I was responsible for the death of mom and a full generation of offspring was more than I could take so I decided to do what I could and ended up saving 5. After escapes and other problems, I'm now down to 2- one tom, one hen. I personally think this is a far cry from another post made teh last few days from a lady who basically said she just robbed a wild turkey nest that was probably still viable and would have made it, but I know many people we should never poses wild turkeys. For what its worth, they are all I have and wont be in contact with any other turkeys, wild or otherwise. Just wanted you to know because you seem very devoted and knowledgeable and suspect I may be reaching out to you again in the future!
     
  7. Hippie Chicks Mom

    Hippie Chicks Mom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Great post! Sorry about your loss. Loved the antibiotic chart! It really helps to show what antibiotics work for this bacteria. As a nurse, we use these charts all the time to give the correct medication. Thanks for letting us learn through your misfortune.
     
  8. hencam

    hencam Out Of The Brooder

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    There's been much research about E. coli on factory farms, but nothing I know of in backyard situations. In factory farms the E. coli thrives when the air is damp and dusty - which is exactly what you get in the enclosed, crowded barns. E. coli will also cause laying problems, including misshapen eggs, impactions and infections. The best thing that we backyard people can do is keep our barns well-ventilated and clean. Get rid of the cobwebs. Even then, a well-cared for bird like yours will sometimes succumb. My favorite hen just died of a respiratory disease linked to E. coli.
     
  9. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Last edited: Jul 2, 2011

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