Firewood

Discussion in 'Hobbies' started by Ole and Lena, Oct 29, 2011.

  1. Ole and Lena

    Ole and Lena Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 22, 2011
    Wright Co Minnesota
    Not sure if it's a hobby or work, but I guess it fits here.

    Like to get a thread rolling of tips, tricks, funny stories, etc relating to every woodsmans favorite job to hate.

    Got most of my wood put up last winter/early spring. Thanks to getting dragged out of state for work and really heavy snow last winter I need to get out and find a little more standing dead wood that'll burn this winter.

    I like to cut my wood green or fresh dead at least 1 year before I will burn it. It splits easier (most species) and holds all it's heat value with none lost to rot. I usually stack some in barn that will burn first in the fall. Any dead punky branches or pith that don't hold fire long are stacked in this pile as I don't need as much heat early in the season. I save the solid stuff for later in the winter. I usually coarse split my logs and stack them in a loose cone over the stump in the winter, bark side up. This allows for some drying. After snow melt I haul it home, finish splitting and stack it in single rows against the barn wall. Some junk plywood cut to overhang the pile and sloped about 15 degrees is placed on top to sluice off any rainfall and loosely spiked down on the windy side of the barn. Wood dries mostly out the ends of the logs so keeping them exposed is vital. DO NOT tarp your wood, it keeps the moisture in and grows mushrooms robbing your hard earned btu s.

    Your chainsaw should say Jonsered, Husqvarna or Stihl. Anything else is a for weekend warriors. Keep a sharp chain. Go with "full chisel" chain if you're comfortable managing kickback. It cust much faster, especially when you have to bury the tip on thick cuts. When cutting in cold weather below freezing, dilute your bar oil with diesel or kerosene to get the right flow. It should be slightly tacky yet free flowing.

    My favorite firewoods in my part of the country are as follows in order. Ash (green black or white)-good high heat value and very easy to split with few knots.
    Sugar maple-Very high heat value, slightly harder to cut and split than ash. Coals well but sometimes hard to keep a slow burn.
    Red Oak-high heat value, burns and coals nicely, difficult to process due to brushy branches, lots of knots
    White Oak- Very high heat value, hard to maintain a slow burn, good to burn hot in cold weather, hard to process with lots of big knots, hard sawing, best mixed with other woods
    Tamarack-Extreme heat value-be careful not to burn out your stove-easy to split, hard to get out of the swamp, best mixed with softer woods
    American elm-high heat value, easy to saw, very hard to split, easy to maintain a slow burn, very clean burning
    Red Maple- Medium heat value, splits easy, burns nice and clean
    Paper Birch- Dries fast, medium heat value, easy to process, makes it's own kindling, DIRTY BURNING BARK
    Box elder- Easy to process, medium heat value, burns nice, stinks when it burns.
    Anything else- Spruce, pine, fire, aspen, willow etc. Tend to be softer fast burning wood. Can be dirty on your chimney. OK to mix in for warmer weather or kindling pile.
     
  2. Crazy4mypeeps

    Crazy4mypeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 17, 2011
    Nebraska
    Our favorite here is seasoned Ash. We currently have 7 chords of Maple. Hey, it was down and it was free, just had to split it. So less work on our end. LOL

    Hubby will agree with you on the Stihl. He just got is first one. 5 times lighter than the 1960's Mac that he was using. [​IMG] I can even run this one. Its got the new start assist on it. No more jerking the saw to get it to run, or setting in down on something. LOL

    We burn all winter, and have our wood furnace run to our duct work throughout the house. Honestly, I wouldn't have it any other way. Can't beat the heat.

    Our wood furnace paid for itself the first year. Propane guy didn't like us much, since we only fill once a year now. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Ole and Lena

    Ole and Lena Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 22, 2011
    Wright Co Minnesota
    Quote:I used to call Stihls "saws that irritate hardworking loggers" or silver SOBs. They've come a long way in 10 years in terms of weight and cold starting. They've always been a good durable saw. Take care of it and it'll be a long time until you need another. Still like my swedes though. Knives and axes too. They make some darn good steel over there. I've got a 52 CC Jonsered that is awesome. Light, fast, big enough for real logs, small enough to use all day on the small stuff. Neighbor that I've been cutting for got wild this summer, bought a saw and felled a bunch of green trees and leaned them up on the fence for me to dry. He wants to get goats next spring and wants the pasture clear of most trees. Good neighbor! I brought him a dozen eggs when I went to cut today.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2011
  4. MullersLaneFarm

    MullersLaneFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 26, 2008
    NW IL Fiber Enabler
    We heat with wood also. We do have a gas furnace, but it is kept at 55*F.

    A tip for splitting. We have our old wood stump with a tire nailed to the top. We place to logs inside the tire and split away. No need to pick up wood until everything in the tire is split.
     
  5. KenK

    KenK Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 23, 2011
    Georgia
    I bought a big Husqvarna saw about 1980 and it was good cutting saw. The only problem with it was if it didn't run at least every couple of weeks it would not start without taking it to the shop. Didn't seem to matter if I left gas in or ran it out of gas. Fortunately the shop was close and the guy didn't charge but a couple bucks to get it going again.

    Moved and quit heating with wood but still needed a little saw just for yard work. Bought the cheapest little Poulan they had at walmart, think it was $99. I really liked that saw, easy to start and about a fourth the weight of the Husky. Of course it was so cheaply made it didn't last but 3-4 years.

    Just this past summer I got a middle of the road Stihl and like it fairly well so far.

    The only way to go in my opinion is to cut firewood in the winter for the next winter.

    We have a fireplace with gas logs and I periodically think about getting the chimney checked out and going back to wood but keep talking myself out of it.
     
  6. Ole and Lena

    Ole and Lena Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 22, 2011
    Wright Co Minnesota
    Quote:Cut the pipe!!!!
     
  7. KenK

    KenK Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 23, 2011
    Georgia
    You would have got along with my dad. He loved a pile of firewood more than anybody I ever knew. He would sit and admire it.

    I understand it. Got the garden put up, meat hanging, wood to warm by...

    We live in old house framed with fat pine and paneled, walls and ceiling, with fat pine. If this old girl ever lit up it would be a sight to behold. As I sit here and count it's actually got five fireplaces. Only the one still has a chimney.

    Got more money than than hard muscle these days. Still... I miss the fire.
     
  8. Ole and Lena

    Ole and Lena Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 22, 2011
    Wright Co Minnesota
    Guess using less storebought gas is more of a pressing concern in MN than GA these days. LP over $2 per gallon this year. 5 tubes of caulk and a can of spray foam and I've still got drafts! Got a big pile of split wood to sit and admire though [​IMG]. Basement full of squash,taters, carrots, parsnips, freezer full of ducks, geese, grouse, pheasant and hopefully soon venison. Grain burners are up to 6 eggs a day now and we've got a couple extra fat roosters for special dinners. Economy be darn, Life is good .[​IMG]. This one's for big oil [​IMG][​IMG].
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2011
  9. KenK

    KenK Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 23, 2011
    Georgia
    Quote:I expect that hits to the nub of it. We got down to the mid thirties last night and it never made the forecast high of the upper sixties this afternoon. I'd love to move further south it weren't already filled up.
     
  10. theghostandmrchicken

    theghostandmrchicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 26, 2011
    After many years of dealing with a "craftsman" my father bought a really nice stihl chainsaw. (I forgot the engine size)

    First time I used it I became a convert. [​IMG]
    It slices through knotted wood nicely and it slices like butter. [​IMG]

    Even though it is heavier than our "craftsman" was you don't spend 40 minutes fiddeling [​IMG] with it just to get it to start and then die on you. [​IMG]



    P.S. The following spring I bought a Echo weedwhacker and it is as nice as a stihl. [​IMG]
     

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