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First time incubator - Day 1 for Silkie eggs

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by d_rooster, Nov 25, 2007.

  1. d_rooster

    d_rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 19, 2007
    North Augusta, SC
    Last night I started six Silkie eggs in a Little Giant still air incubator w/auto egg turner to which I've added a digital hygrometer, Water Wiggler, and an alligator clip on the control knob for easier temp adjustment.

    I had a stable 99.5 F. temp reading on the inside of the Water Wiggler before putting the eggs into the incubator. After putting the room temp eggs in the 'bator the temp dropped to about 97.3 F. and slowly crept back to 98 point something by 2 a.m. I'm assuming the temporary initial drop in temp is normal because of the new load in the 'bator.

    With minor temp control adjustments, the 'bator is now back up to a 99.5 F. reading inside the Water Wiggler, although thermometer built into the hygrometer reads 102 F. for air temp inside 'bator. Humidity level is hovering at about 62%. From reading other's post, it sounds like I'm within tolerance levels or maybe just a little high on the humidity. Although from what I can gather these inexpensive hygrometers aren't the most accurate things in the world.

    I'm so excited about these eggs. I was up to 2 a.m. hovering over the 'bator to make sure the temps didn't overshoot. Then back up at 7 a.m. for another temp check, slept till 9 a.m., then back to the 'bator again. Hopefully, I'll become less anxious as the days progress. Otherwise I'll be needing some anxiety medication by day 21. [​IMG]

    I gave the other six Silkie eggs to "Broody Betty" my buff cochin bantam who couldn't be broken easily from her broodiness. Betty seems much calmer and more confident than me. [​IMG]

    ~Donald in North Augusta, SC
    http://dad-who-spins.blogspot.com/
     
  2. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Humidity is a bit high, so if you can open another vent that would be great. The temps may take up to a day to stabilize after putting in eggs.
     
  3. bunch-a-chickens

    bunch-a-chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 23, 2007
    Claiborne County Tn.
    you dont have to worry too much about temp and humidity. Do hens not get off the nest and eat and drink? there can be lots of flux there, am i right? everyone make such a big deal about being just perfect that they forget that nature is never perfect and everything seems to work out perfect, doesnt it?
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2007
  4. d_rooster

    d_rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 19, 2007
    North Augusta, SC
    Yes, silkiechicken, I have another vent hole that I could open on top of the incubator. I'll try that.

    I had trouble getting the humidity above 40% in the beginning with just the inner well in the center bottom filled, so I filled all available water wells in the bottom with pre-heated distilled water. That got things going nicely.

    The incubator temp seems to be holding pretty consistently. Now I get to play the waiting game and do the countdown. As a distraction from the incubator watching, I have been giving my adult chickens some more attention and fun today. I had a couple of bales of straw in their pens that I spread out for them to scratch in. I saw some little creepy crawlies in the straw and the chickens were going crazy. I just took them some afternoon treats of leftover cooked rice and some hamburgers that got a little overdone for human tastes. I still love my big chickens as much as I did when they were little balls of fluff.

    I think bunch-a-chickens is correct about nature not being perfect and things still turning out okay, or at least as intended. I think that in nature "the flux" is part of the process that eliminates the weak or marginal offspring early on. However, I'm still guilty along with many others who obsess over the variables when attempting to reproduce a natural process in an artificial environment. I work in a science research lab and there's a big emphasis placed on controlling as many variables as possible to get reliable results. It's hard to shake that desire to control stuff.

    So far I've not noticed my hen, Betty, taking any measurements or recording any data with her six eggs, or is she?. She can probably feel what is the right temperature with her bottom and she's keeping a mental checklist of egg positions for turning purposes. Betty might be smarter than I thought.

    ~Donald in SC
    http://dad-who-spins.blogspot.com/
     

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