First time incubator

PETERKAY012

In the Brooder
Nov 30, 2015
32
0
35
400


So I am getting this incubator and it will be coming in the mail soon. I have never incubated eggs and I didn't want to deal with having to turns eggs so I got one that turns automatically. What is the process of incubating these? Do I just go in the morning and grab and egg and put it in? I have raised chicks many time I just have never started them from an egg. Also, how many days does the incubation take and what is the deal with the rooster? Does the rooster fertilize the eggs all year or is there a breeding season or what?
 

ArcticMermaid

Chirping
Jun 7, 2015
101
10
74
North Carolina
Set up your incubator and let it run for a couple days to get it calibrated so you know it is holding temperature and humidity. Then put how many eggs you want in it or as many as it holds. Do not wash them before incubating. Chickens breed all year, incubation takes 21 days. When the counter reaches 18 days you turn off or unplug the auto turner. If you don't it cant cause the chicks to drown. check out the following link for more info on incubation

http://modernfarmer.com/2015/04/how-to-incubate-chicken-eggs/
 

Hermit House

In the Brooder
Dec 17, 2015
37
10
24
Vadsby, Denmark
Welcome to the grand experiment! You are in for a treat.

Ok, a few things

Fertilized eggs can be kept for up to 3 weeks for hatching. They should be kept warm (15°c) and should large end up. Turn them once a day, along the equator - mark one side with an X and another with an O so you can tell. Once you have your 10, it's time for the incubator.

They take 3 weeks to incubate and the requirements change later in the process, so you can not just add one every day. Do em in batches. Besides, they are flock critters, they want a clutch of nest mates. The incubator will take care of turning, but you will need to keep an eye on humidity and temperature throughout.

Each mating between rooster and hen provides enough sperm to fertilise eggs for up to 3 weeks.

Most of these questions are answered in deep detail here in the forums and in the Learning Center, but I thought I'd get you going :D
Feel free to ask, if I don't know I can help you find it.

Ted
 

Yorkshire Coop

*
Premium Feather Member
6 Years
Aug 16, 2014
22,833
25,183
1,247
My top tip would be to double check your temps and humidity with a seperate, known to be correct thermometer and hygrometer. Often incubators are said to be calibrated but they can be wrong. I find it best to double check just to be on the safe side.

This article is a bible on incubating ~ https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/hatching-eggs-101
Lots of fabulous information on all aspects of incubating and hatching.

Wishing you the very best of luck with your incubation, I hope you have great results :D
 

Sally Sunshine

cattywampus
Premium Feather Member
Aug 23, 2012
57,645
10,978
967
PA


So I am getting this incubator and it will be coming in the mail soon. I have never incubated eggs and I didn't want to deal with having to turns eggs so I got one that turns automatically.
What is the process of incubating these? Hatching Eggs 101


Collection & Storage of Eggs
Sources for eggs are to search the BYC buy sell trade section, Craigslist and eBay. Your local thread on BYC may be the best bet for local eggs!
Look for your local site in the “Social section” “Where am I? Where are You!” on BYC. &
HATCHING EGGS FOR SALE/TRADE BYC https://www.backyardchickens.com/f/36/chicken-hatching-eggs

The following Word File can be used when ordering shipped eggs, it is our suggestion that you copy/paste/edit to help you get the best eggs possible. Letter written by ozexpat

An open letter to egg shippers.doc 27k .doc file

REMINDER THAT YOU MAY BE ENTITLED TO REIMBURSEMENT OF DAMAGED SHIPPED EGGS
SEE LINKS FOR INFO! https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/the-truth-about-insuring-hatching-eggs
http://www.jordan-farm.com/blog/

BIO SECURITY!
Risks associated with hatching eggs of chickens
http://www.slideshare.net/mahmoudghonim/handbook-of-poultry-diseases-2
http://www.biosecurity.govt.nz/files/biosec/consult/draft-ra-hatching-eu-ca-usa-aus.pdf


Choose eggs that are of good size, not abnormally big or small. Do NOT set dirty, cracked, or porous eggs.
Clinical studies at the University of Arkansas have shown that if your going to set a dirty egg, set the dirty egg, DO NOT SAND, WASH OR WIPE dirty eggs as hatchability decreases with these practices!
Cuticula is the thin membrane that covers the whole eggshell that is made from the sticky fluid when laid which covers it and quickly dissolves due to carbondioxyde activity.
This membrane can be penetrated by gasses but functions as a kind defensive mechanism to prevent the entry of bacteria.


The washing and rubbing action also serves to force disease organisms through the pores of the shell. Place the eggs upright in an egg carton with the FAT, air cell end of the egg UP! Allow eggs to sit in a moderately cool, somewhat humid place for storage. Basements are great. Moderately cool means 55-65 degrees. Rotate your eggs a 3 times a day to keep the embryo from sticking. An easy way to turn all of the eggs at once is to place a thick book under one end of the carton, and later remove the book and put it under the other end of the carton, 3 times a day. Before adding eggs to the incubator always WARM eggs UP slowly to room temperature. IF THE EGGS ARE COLD Condensation can cause bacterial growth on the eggs! You can collect eggs up until 10 days or so, but after the 7th day lower hatch rates may result.
Stored eggs take longer to hatch (about one hour per day of storage).
if you must wash using water warmer than the egg using warm water
as to not force bacteria into the egg( thermal properties) 1T bleach per gal.

It is important to ALWAYS wash your hands before handling your hatching eggs!

Omphalitis, yolk sack infection is caused by a bacterium that enters through the porous egg shell and easily kills embryo's and newly hatched chicks. Unfortunately, incubation conditions are ideal for breeding bacteria as well as incubating eggs. For more information on storing eggs refer to Recommendations for hatching egg handling and storage

Egg Cleaning Procedures​

for the Backyard Flock

http://food.unl.edu/documents/EggCleaning.pdf


note Tek-Trol Disinfectant Cleaner Concentrate is a better bleach alternative!​
Incubation Chart
Here is a free app...http://homesteadapps.com/app/free/hatchchart/hatchturnscheentry.php
The following table lists incubation requirements for various species of fowl.

and what is the deal with the rooster?
hu.gif
they fertilize eggs
lau.gif
Does the rooster fertilize the eggs all year or is there a breeding season or what? All year most chicken breeds

GOOD LUCK!!!
bun.gif

oh and its nice to meet you! you need anything just hollar at the link to the incubating w/ friends thread as we are always on it! INCUBATING w/FRIENDS! come hatch, learn, Chat, Meet new Friends!
 
Last edited:

PETERKAY012

In the Brooder
Nov 30, 2015
32
0
35
Welcome to the grand experiment! You are in for a treat.

Ok, a few things

Fertilized eggs can be kept for up to 3 weeks for hatching.  They should be kept warm (15°c) and should large end up. Turn them once a day, along the equator - mark one side with an X and another with an O so you can tell.  Once you have your 10, it's time for the incubator.

They take 3 weeks to incubate and the requirements change later in the process, so you can not just add one every day. Do em in batches. Besides, they are flock critters, they want a clutch of nest mates. The incubator will take care of turning, but you will need to keep an eye on humidity and temperature throughout.

Each mating between rooster and hen provides enough sperm to fertilise eggs for up to 3 weeks.

Most of these questions are answered in deep detail here in the forums and in the  Learning Center, but I thought I'd get you going :D
Feel free to ask, if I don't know I can help you find it.

Ted

So are you saying if I kept the eggs at 51 degrees Celsius, I can keep them for three weeks and I can still incubate them after like a week of just sitting? Also, can I eat the fertilized eggs if I just put them in the fridge, like will I be killing a chick?
 

Yorkshire Coop

*
Premium Feather Member
6 Years
Aug 16, 2014
22,833
25,183
1,247
So are you saying if I kept the eggs at 51 degrees Celsius, I can keep them for three weeks and I can still incubate them after like a week of just sitting? Also, can I eat the fertilized eggs if I just put them in the fridge, like will I be killing a chick?


I would not store eggs for more than a week before setting them in the incubator. You should get better results with eggs that are a week or less in age. Anything older and the quality of the egg can diminish.

As for eating fertilised eggs go ahead and get them down your neck!! They are fine to eat, you are not killing a chick. Cell/embryo development only begins if they are incubated at the optimum temperature. ie by a hen or in an incubator.
 

Hermit House

In the Brooder
Dec 17, 2015
37
10
24
Vadsby, Denmark
We had really good results from eggs up to 3 weeks old with the regimen I mentioned. 70+% hatch rate. Of course, that 30% could have been the oldest - I'm just going on the info I've found.
A fertilized egg will only develop if it has the right conditions - temperature mostly, so collect them daily and chow down.
 

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