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FIRST time pregnant goat owner

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by New Farmer, Mar 5, 2015.

  1. New Farmer

    New Farmer Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 14, 2012
    Western Mountains, Maine
    Good morning,
    I have a Nubien goat that is due to deliver in about 10 days. I have read lots of material, but still feel very unprepared. What due I need for supplies to be ready? Iodine? (for dipping naval?) Do I have to cut the imbilacal cord? I read that I should separate kids from mom asap and bottle feed yet others say to leave with mom for only three days? Others just put them out and it is what it is. Any info and support is greatly needed. I live in MAine. Still cold nights and some days. bring them in? I am stressed and feel helpless not knowing how to handle this situation. HELP PLEASE!
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. kyflock

    kyflock Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 26, 2012
    I've had before iodine, sheets, an aspirator, bottles and nipples just in case, powdered colostrum, scissors and thread for the cord... just in case... several other things. I've never actually caught the process in the act, though... and usually go out first thing in the morning to see teeny tiny cuties walking around! Has your doe given birth before? If she has and it went well I think chances are great that it will go good again.

    I personally would never separate babies unless absolutely necessary... if one is rejected or not doing well for some reason. I know some people do... but that's just not how we roll. If you want to milk her as long as you do it consistently she should still have enough milk for the babies too. Kids or lambs who are bottle fed can get bloat leading to a bad end. I had triplets born last winter and had to bottle feed one who was rejected and she did great. She is definitely braver and friendlier than the rest, though. I can see why bottle feeding is appealing. :)

    I used to live in Maine.. so I know how cold it is still there! Do you have a heat lamp available in their shed/barn/wherever? If so... if it's below freezing and she might have it I probably would turn it on just so that a wet newborn babe stays warm enough... But mine were born last winter and I was super worried about it being so cold... they just piled up together and were always warm and toasty. I like my animals to be mama-raised if at all possible... so to encourage the bonding process and goat behavior I never like bringing them inside... but if one is weak and it's cold most people I know do... at least for a while to check on it.

    Before my first kids were born I spent an hour or so watching goat birth videos on youtube. It really helped a lot to know fully what to expect. My only other advice is to have a phone number of an experienced person or a vet... just in case... for you to call if you need it.
     
  3. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Escanaba, MI
    Unless you are prepared to bottle feed for 8-12 weeks don't separate dam and kids. Dam raising is healthier for the kid, and they're just as friendly as long as they're handled daily, too. Bottle feeding is necessary if a doe is CAE+ though, because that disease is passed through the milk. They can't even get her colostrum if that is the case, they'd need it from a different, clean source. Unless she rejects them, then you would have no choice but to bottle feed.

    Birthing area needs to be clean, dry, and draft free. A place you can separate her from the rest of the herd because they can get in the way. Because it is cold, make sure the kids dry off quickly after birth. When they're strong enough, they can join the herd, but don't let them get into deep snow if that is an issue.

    Unless you know the dam has been vaccinated for CDT and has had a booster within 100 days of birth, you will need to vaccinate the kids shortly after birth.

    I dip the corns in iodine. The cords naturally break usually. If they're too long, clamp them to the length I want them to be, then I trim them with a pair of scissors that I dipped in rubbing alcohol before touching the cord. I dip the cord before and after the cut.

    When all kids are out (bounce the doe, wrap your hands around her lower tummy where her uterus is and lift up a few times. If there is something hard and knobby that you feel, you are feeling a kid. Organs are soft and squishy. If you feel a kid, she's not done yet), just let the placenta come naturally. It can take a while sometimes. Nursing kids helps stimulate the final contractions that eject the placenta. NEVER pull on a placenta. That can tear or invert the uterus.

    Make sure the kids nurse promptly once they're dry and taking their first steps. Most figure it out rather quickly, but some need guided to the teat.

    DO you have a a livestock veterinarian you can contact in case things go poorly? For instance, a kid stuck that you cannot dislodge, or the dam hemorrhaging? If not, you need to start searching right now.
     
  4. New Farmer

    New Farmer Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 14, 2012
    Western Mountains, Maine
    Thank you for all the much valued info. Dixie is two days over her due date. I am watching her in the monitor as a type. She is just now showing very real signs of birthing. I do have a vet that will come if needed and also an experienced goat owner who is also available. I am just praying that all goes smooth. Her last delivery was without problems so I am told so hopefully this time around will be the same. I will keep you posted.
     
  5. SelahJ

    SelahJ New Egg

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    Mar 11, 2015
    Sooooo...any babies?
     
  6. New Farmer

    New Farmer Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 14, 2012
    Western Mountains, Maine
    Yes..,. SelahJ..... We now have babies! A boy and a girl. Mom and babies are doing great! I think I made a mistake by choosing to bottle feed. I went with the info that I got from a goat farmer here close by. A lot of work but at the same time it has been fun. I'm having a problem getting them to poop. There is so many opinions out there. Some say enema, some say not, some say karo, some say not. I've been watching closely in hopes that they will just start pooping.
     
  7. H Diamond

    H Diamond Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 26, 2014
    Well, in the case of not pooping, doing nothing is probably not the best choice. How long have they not pooped? How old are they? How much are they getting to drink and how often and what are you giving them? How do you know they have not pooped at all? Are they inside or outside? On pine shavings, hay?
     
  8. New Farmer

    New Farmer Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 14, 2012
    Western Mountains, Maine
    They were born Saturday night around 8:00. Sunday they poopd out a whole lot of sticky black poop. I was told to watch for it to turn yellow. I saw a small amount of yellow poop on Sunday night and early morning yesterday. The male pooped out two little pebbles yellow this morning and little girl a very small amount of a darker brown. Like maybe 1/8 of a teaspoon. They are in the house. They are now on absorbent pads so I can see what they are pooping out. So far they haven't tried to eat the pads. They are eating their mother's milk. Don't ask why I'm bottle feeding.... I was told it was the best but not knowing I was only trying to do the right thing.?. They are drinking between 4-5 oz every 4 or so hours. Sometimes slightly more. Some one mentioned karo syrup????
     
  9. H Diamond

    H Diamond Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 26, 2014
    You're doing what you knew best, and no one can fault you for that! :) .
    It will not hurt them to have a little enema. I use the actually human baby enemas from the store and just cut off a little piece of one.
    When do they get their next bottle? If these are full size kids, your amount of milk/day is a pretty good number. If they are minis, you're a little high on the amount.
    This may sound silly, but their bottoms are cleaned off, right? There isn't a build up of that sticky poo to stop them up?
    I've got to get some work done, so if after their next bottle they don't poo at all, post back here and we'll try to help you with the babies.
     
  10. New Farmer

    New Farmer Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 14, 2012
    Western Mountains, Maine
    Yes their little butts are clean. Still no poop. They do not seem uncomfortable and seem to be standing and walking with no problem. I have seen no sign of them pushing or trying to poop. I'm worried. They are full sized kids. The male is much bigger then she is. I can't tell you how much they weigh because I have no scale, but I know they are not premies. They are same size as other healthy kids I have seen. Thank you for helping me out with this. no belly bloat.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2015

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