first time process

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by wvdragon1, Mar 30, 2012.

  1. wvdragon1

    wvdragon1 New Egg

    8
    0
    7
    Mar 21, 2012
    well today seems to be hard have to kill one of my birds and am finding it hard to do emotionally i can kill a deer process it with no problem but this feels weird maybe its me just had to post this to get it out
     
  2. WalkingWolf1

    WalkingWolf1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    314
    41
    118
    Feb 15, 2012
    Vermilion
    I think many folks experience this. There is an innate attachment to something that you have nurtured from such a small, helpless creature to what it has now become. You just need to keep in mind why you raised it in the first place. Their role was to provide food for you. There will be more but the first ones are always special. I have killed many farm animals (chickens, rabbits, hogs, sheep, goats, cattle). I still feel an attachment to the animals I raise. At this stage I do not experience the guilt. This is just a natural cycle. It does get better. Best of luck to you.
     
  3. xC0000005

    xC0000005 Chillin' With My Peeps

    213
    23
    121
    Nov 1, 2009
    Kirkland, WA
    I think this is completely normal. You've cared for the bird, fed it watched it grow. Letting it take its final place and fulfill its mission of feeding you can be an awkward jump the first few times.
     
  4. wvdragon1

    wvdragon1 New Egg

    8
    0
    7
    Mar 21, 2012
    Ty for the motivational help the deed is done and i feel it was right Ty
     
  5. wvdragon1

    wvdragon1 New Egg

    8
    0
    7
    Mar 21, 2012
    it was hard at first
     
  6. goldnchocolate

    goldnchocolate Chillin' With My Peeps

    774
    4
    143
    May 9, 2008
    Massachusetts
    It took me a few days to recover from the first time I killed a chicken. It was very hard....[​IMG]
     
  7. bj taylor

    bj taylor Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,131
    35
    168
    Oct 28, 2011
    North Central Texas
    this is the GIANT hurdle looming in front of me. hubby isn't interested at all, so i can't pawn it off on him. it's a few months yet for me. i need to get a cone. i read on another thread where the chicken fell out of the cone. i DO NOT want any mishaps that bring more trauma to the chicken or me. i'm pretty confident i can work my way through the following steps. especially after getting such great details from this site.
     
  8. goldnchocolate

    goldnchocolate Chillin' With My Peeps

    774
    4
    143
    May 9, 2008
    Massachusetts
    I use a cone and have never had one "fall out" but have had them almost turn themselves around...top to bottom...because they were able to get a grip on the sides with their feet. So now, when I place them into the cone, I keep a firm hold on the feet until I get the head out the other end. Once the head is out the I get a good hold on that so that I can get the neck in the proper position. Once I make the cut I again get a firm hold on the feet because when the nerves cause them to convulse I don't want it to accidently pop out of the cone.
     
  9. Poultrybonkers

    Poultrybonkers Overrun With Chickens

    3,008
    274
    256
    Mar 22, 2011
    Only mine fall out of cones. My first time I was nervous but got over that quickly as I don't get attached to anything at all. :) I got 3 more to do in a few weeks. Hopefully these will be easier. :)
     
  10. booker81

    booker81 Redneck Tech Girl

    1,929
    32
    183
    Apr 18, 2010
    Mid-MI
    It's a normal reaction if it's not a process you're used to or raised with - after all, most folks don't have livestock that they eat. They get it from a store or someone else. Most people are used to the concept that killing something is a very bad thing. It's hard to "rewire" that thinking to one that it's normal to kill an animal to make food out of it - most especially an animal you raise. Deer are tasty critters, but usually one doesn't know it closely and raise it from birth and then shoot it - it's not really the same process as raising livestock for food.

    There's a lot of care that goes into raising healthy, humanely treated livestock, and once you get over that hardest hump, you've got it made for having the best, freshest, most humane meat possible for food :)
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by