First time raising chicks- Tiny sneezes?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by dandypandy12, Nov 3, 2013.

  1. dandypandy12

    dandypandy12 New Egg

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    Nov 3, 2013
    Hello there!

    I Have kept a small flock (5 hens) of chickens for about two years now and recently decided to try hatching my own! I Bought some eggs from a local lady who keeps a massive flock of all different breeds. Out of 18 eggs only three hatched and they are all VERY sweet! Two cread (cream?) leghorns (I cant quite read the handwriting on the list the woman gave me!) and a barred plymouth rock.

    The youngest is 5 days old and a i recently have heard them all starting to make tiny little sneezing noises. Normal with my adults chikens I would give them a bit of garlic (which usually sorted most things out) but im not sure if that would be okay for young chicks? any one have and knowledge on that?

    What could have caused the sneezing? (and when I say sneezing its just tiny little things, no mucus or anything and they are all bright eyes, lively and eating and drinking)

    I am keeping them in a cage inside with a fake mother chicken mat (they crawl underneath it and snuggle up there) and also next to a radiator. I am using kitchen roll for the flooring and am feeding them chick crumbs (got from a friend who recently raised chicks so I am not sure of the brand) and i cover half the cage with a blanket incase of any draughts (though i dont think there are any in my room?)

    any help or tips on raising them would be greatley appreciated!!! thank you :)
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    With small chicks, respiratory illness is often from poor ventilation.
    In nature, they won't be confined to a brooder.

    IMO with the proper temperature, one doesn't have to worry about drafts.
    A mother hen will warm them up when they get a chill but can't keep drafts off of them.

    It's best to give them a warm spot and lots of cool space to simulate nature.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2013
  3. dandypandy12

    dandypandy12 New Egg

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    Nov 3, 2013
    okay, so should i take the blaneket off? or maybe open a window occasionaly? (though its fairly cold outside!)
     
  4. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    It doesn't matter what the outside temperature is. If the chicks have a warm spot the rest of the space could be zero and they'll be OK.
    A mother hen provides a spot around 100 degrees and everywhere else is cool.
    Judge it by the chicks actions. If they crowd the heat source, they're too cold. If they roam around the space, it's just right. If they stay far from the heat source, it's too hot.

    If the blanket inhibits fresh air, then yes, remove it.
     
  5. dandypandy12

    dandypandy12 New Egg

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    okay :) thanks a bunch! Ive removed the blanket and have opened a window to let fresh air in and i shall see how it goes :) any tips on the garlic? would it hurt them at all? (just because I know its good in genral for adult chickens health :) )
     
  6. PrairieChickens

    PrairieChickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dust, dander, and poor air ventilation can all contribute to sniffly chickies. You can try to give them garlic if they'll take it, but if they have a balanced diet and good environment, they should mend just fine on their own.
     
  7. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    To give garlic I take cloves and crush them and put them in the water. The oils will work their way into the water.
     
  8. dandypandy12

    dandypandy12 New Egg

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    I shall try that :) usually my big girls will just attack a full clove and gobble it up but i dont think these little dears have quite got that yet! :lol:
     

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