First time to fry a turkey- need help/suggestions

Discussion in 'Egg, Chicken, & Other Favorite Recipes' started by cackle, Nov 27, 2008.

  1. cackle

    cackle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 8, 2008
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    Okay, We are going to fry a turkey and a chicken for thanksgiving. I had bought a turkey fryer for scalding purposes and my kids decided while it was new that we should break it in by frying our turkey. The turkey is small- only 12 pounds so I am also going to fry one of my 6 pound cornish.

    Any thing I need to be aware of? The instructions I have say 4.5 minutes a pound then someone told me no it is 3. I am assuming that the chicken will take per pound the same as the turkey.

    Happy Thanksgiving to All.

    Susan
     
  2. sred98

    sred98 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 18, 2008
    Oklahoma
    There are a couple of things you need to be sure of...first of all, that the turkey is completely thawed. If not, it can explode. Not in a frozen coke way, but pop and rupture and spray hot oil.

    Also, take the time to fill the turkey fryer with water equal to the amount of oil you were going to use, then place your turkey in it. That way, you can eyeball where the oil needs to be and you only spill water, not boiling oil! Be sure and dry it out good before adding the oil, though.

    I am thinking a 12 pound turkey takes about 40-45 minutes in the fryer, so that is about 3 1/2 minutes per pound.

    Be sure and season it well, inside and out before you put it in there.

    Are you using pure peanut oil, or a blend?

    Oh! And make sure you are not frying this on a wooden deck or near dry leaves or a trash pile! We always hear of someone where I live setting the house on fire while trying to do this. Usually though, there is alcohol involved and they didn't test the oil level and are on a wooden deck. Then, when the oil overflows, there's a flaming river that spreads across the deck/yard/whatever.

    If you just follow common sense and keep a limited number of people away from the fryer, it is a great way to cook a turkey!

    Shelly



    Good luck! Nothing like a deep fried turkey! [​IMG]
     
  3. scgamecock

    scgamecock Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 18, 2008
    Conway SC
    Gonna deep fry one today for lunch.The biggest mistake people make is too much oil in the pot.Second thing is don't get your oil too hot cause it can burn easily.I use cottonseed oil I get from Basspro shops cause it has the highest scald point.I like to cook at 350 to 375 degrees if possible so get somewhere that the wind won't be a factor.Get your oil up to 400 and then put your turkey in and the temp will fall back to the desired temp.If you don't you will never get it back up and will be cooking an extra 30 minute's to get it done.Always check the leg joint to see if it's done, if it is the rest is perfect.Hope this helps.
     
  4. Just do not be the guy that does not get enough bars on his cell phone. If you have seen this commercial it is pretty funny, at least for a cell phone commercial.

    If you have a submersable thermometer, you can heat the peanut oil/water mix to the point were the water just starts to boil (measure the water on top for temperature, about 200 F). As stated above, the oil needs to get to about 350 degrees. What this all means is that only one person should be at the helm at this point. You now have boiling water and very hot oil. It is important to have a bit of water over the oil before you put the bird in and this will boil off during the cooking process. Once you get the process going, DO NOT add more water even if it all boils off, this is dangerous as the water will "flash" boil and possibly take hot oil with it. Peanut oil has a boiling point too, so be sure either the bird is in the mix or you have a bit of water over the oil, agian never add more water once the oil gets hot.

    Water boils at 212 degrees. The oil will be at 350 and above. The water WILL boil off and more than likely completely. Use enough oil to completely submerge the bird. Start with hafl and half water/oil. Then put the bird in without heat. The water will be displaced and you should get to the point were you can put just enough oil in the get the job done (it will go to the bottom of the mix). I have seen some actually thaw thier birds in the mix. When you start the flames, be sure everything is wiped dry on the outside.

    People really like birds cooked this way. Although it is a dangerous method, common sense and good precaution will make the day go without a problem. Just keep everyone away from the cooking bird and only allow adults who are sober to come and see you. Be a "disignated cook".
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 27, 2008
  5. Possumpoint

    Possumpoint Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 1, 2008
    All of the above posts are right on, but I would add that it's helpful if you use a piece of poultry twine to secure the wings to the body of the turkey, or either place it on the fryer poulty insert so that the wings don't get caught on the side of the pot when you submerge it into the oil. Last year, a neighbor here had that problem and gave himself a severe burn trying to get the wings into the pot.

    Hubby is working today, so I'm roasting my bird in the oven. I let him do all the outdoor frying and smoking.

    Be safe, and have a Blessed Thanksgiving!
     
  6. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    Apr 6, 2007
    Iceland
    All good suggestions.


    We use our fryer A LOT.


    When you put the turkey in the pot lower it SLOWLY. The
    biggest danger of fryers is the splattering oil. Not only
    will it burn but it could ignite if it gets close to the burner.

    Keep the fryer away from everything. We use a dirt spot behind
    our house away from flammable stuff. The oil will get oil the ground
    and make a mess.

    I agree that 45 minutes in 375 degree oil should do it. We always
    use a meat thermometer and make sure the meat in the deep breast
    and inner thighs have reached 180.

    Sometimes when we fry the dark meat has a pink tint to it. We eat
    it and have never gotten sick.

    Enjoy!!
     
  7. Wifezilla

    Wifezilla Positively Ducky

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    Oct 2, 2008
    Colorado
    How NOT to fry your turkey...

     
  8. cackle

    cackle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 8, 2008
    North Carolina
    Thanks for all the suggestions. We are using a 10x10 concrete slab away from the house. Previous owner had dog pens over the slab. We got rid of the rusting dog pens and just have the slab which now we know what it is perfect for. We are using a peanut oi mix from Louanne foods. It was not enough so we are adding another gallon of peanut oil. I will make sure we watch for the wings. I would hate to have anyone get hurt.


    400 degrees to start and then cook at 350 to 275. I will take the instant read thermometer out there and make sure the deep breast and thighs reach 180 degrees.

    It will be interesting to see which taste best the cornish cross or the turkey. Both were local raised. I am thinking the cornish.. But I am not a big turkey fan.

    Thanks again to everyone...

    Now we are cooking.

    One more question how long and how do you store the oil? That stuff is not cheap.


    Susan
     
  9. Possumpoint

    Possumpoint Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Once the oil is cool, strain it and using a funnel, pour it back into the original containers it came in and seal. Store in a cool place and you can use it again to fry more birds. If you strain it well with each use, you should be able to use it three times. We always keep some fresh peanut oil around to pour in to the pot if needed. We also use the turkey oil to fry seafood outside as well, but then we throw it away. As long as it's sealed well and kept in a cool place, it will last a good while.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2008
  10. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    Iceland
    This time of year we leave th oil in the fryer. We put a garbage bag over
    the entire thing. We will use the same oil for a few months or until I burn
    it because I'm not paying attention to it. That's a big danger too. Oil
    heated beyond the flashpoint it a potential bomb.

    The correct way is what Possumpoint said to do. Drop it to around 100
    degrees so it flows, strain and drain.


    You can use vegetable oil too. Peanut oil in bulk is almost $10 a gallon
    here. Vegie oil is half that. We get ours at Costco.
     

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