First timer, here. Is it ok that the yolk is moving?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by sepaditty1, Jan 19, 2014.

  1. sepaditty1

    sepaditty1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've got my first batch of eggs in my incubator. Today is day 3. I candled them for the first time. All but one of them have a large dark mass. I guess that's the yolk. In 4 of those 6, it's moving around when I turn the egg. Is that normal? I have told myself that these eggs are just a learning experience and it's ok if they don't hatch. But you know that I would love to have at least one or two make it out.
     
  2. Smithyard Farm

    Smithyard Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    when candling, its pretty hard to see the "yolk", so I am unsure what your are seeing. could it be the air sac moving? You will start to see tiny veins forming. Day three is a little early to be looking. Leave them for a bit and check at day 7

    Good Luck!!
     
  3. sepaditty1

    sepaditty1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I can do that. I told myself that since I don't know what I'm looking for, it doesn't make much sense to look. But I got excited.
     
  4. Smithyard Farm

    Smithyard Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    it is exciting!! I did the same thing too!.. now you will know not to bother.. [​IMG] I have to admit though... sometimes I just have to take a peek! [​IMG]
     
  5. CayuseRanch

    CayuseRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I frequently see the yolk in early candling on my light colored eggs. it is normal for the yolk to move as the egg moves. between days 5-7 you will begin seeing red veins from the air sac to a dark dot the embryo. I candle much more frequently than recommended.
     
  6. The Mother Hen

    The Mother Hen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    IMPORTANT: I wouldn't candle them until day 6 or 7. The egg(s) need to form the blood veins first before you candle them. I would candle them a few times just to make sure one isn't fertile. Turn the eggs TWICE a day after the veins form. This rotates the chick and prevents the shell sticking to the chick after it hatches. You can mark with a sharpie an X and O so you can remember if you turned them or not. The mark will not bother the chick, it will simply eat part of the shell while it pips, or hatches. After a week or so you will start to see the baby much clearer. Beware ANY eggs that might get too hot. If they are fertile or not they can explode. I haven't had that happen to my eggs, but I have heard others have.

    Keep the eggs at 99 degrees F. and make it HUMID. The eggs need water in the incubator to keep the egg moist. 105 degrees F. is TOO HIGH, it will kill your chicks. I know this because I had my broody hens hatch some eggs outside and there was a temperature spike after it had rained a month before. It killed off some of the chicks in their shells, practically baking them.

    Be careful when candeling them. You will need a firm hold on the egg (not too tight because you might crush it) so it doesn't fall out of your palm. Make sure you only have a flashlight in your hand and nothing else with the egg.

    Unless a chick ABSOLUTELY needs help, do not touch them while they work and pip. The chick needs to break free from its shell on its own because it makes them stronger as they learn to stand. Unless a chick gets squished, it is best not to pick them up until day 3. Day 3 after hatching should be the time to feed them MEDICATED chick starter feed. Why three days to wait? They eat a lot of their shell plus they gain nutrients from a sack at the end of their umbilical cord (which attaches itself into the navel). They will not need the medicated food until that time. Clean out there box regularly and make sure they get enough room to run around in. Just so you know, chicks will rest their heads on the ground, so no need to worry about that in the future.
     
  7. sepaditty1

    sepaditty1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for all that. I feel like I don't know anything. I think I might caandle once more on day 8 or so, and then leave them alone until they either hatch...or don't.
     
  8. The Mother Hen

    The Mother Hen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No problem! When I started out I had to look up a lot of stuff about hatching chicks in the incubator. Just so you know, some chicks might die off because of bad genes or bacteria or other reasons. It kind of depends on the rooster, he needs to mate with the stronger hens to produce stronger chicks.

    No, leaving them alone is not good for the eggs, you need to turn them. Normally the hen would turn the eggs by getting in and out of their box. She kind of "scrambles" them with her feet by lifting the eggs onto them and they turn. I am not saying put fertile eggs on your feet, but all you can do is just rotate them form one side to another twice a day without picking them up. Marking the sides helps you remember to turn them or not. I think turning the eggs work, because I did have a chick with a bit of stuck shell on them and it wasn't good.

    And I was wrong about the feeding time. It should be two days after they hatch is when you feed them, not three.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2014
  9. sepaditty1

    sepaditty1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Gotchya!
     

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