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Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by hwall, Feb 2, 2013.

  1. hwall

    hwall New Egg

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    Feb 2, 2013
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    Hi! Over the summer I got two female Rouen ducks and I ended up taking care of a friends male pekin duck. I thought I would have more time to prepare for this because when I researched them they were spring layers and it's the middle of winter! Anyhoo.. They laid their first eggs yesterday (yay!) but I don't know if they're fertile or not. I do have them in an incubator and I've read about candling. Does anyone have some helpful advice? Thanks!
     
  2. gabrielle1976

    gabrielle1976 Overrun With Chickens

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    IF its the first egg just crack it open and see if theres a bulls eye that shows its fertile then likely that most the eggs after will be as well.
     
  3. hwall

    hwall New Egg

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    Feb 2, 2013
    Delaware
    Thanks :)
     
  4. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member

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    Is it Fertile or Infertile?


    To check the fertility, simply break an egg in a bowl. Find the white spot on the yolk. If you do not, use a spoon to gently flip the yolk over until you find it.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    If the egg is fertile, the white mark will be nearly perfectly round and in the center it will be yellow;
    it will resemble a donut. If it is infertile, the white mark will not be very round, and in most cases, smaller than that of the fertile mark. If the egg is not fertile, the 'white mark' is called a "blastodisc". If the egg is fertile, the 'white mark' it is called a "blastoderm", and this means that cell division, because of fertilization, occurred.
    A link with more pics of fertile vs Non Eggs! https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/16008/how-to-tell-a-fertile-vs-infertile-egg-pictures
     
  5. hwall

    hwall New Egg

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    Feb 2, 2013
    Delaware
    Thanks! Also, a really stupid question. If they are fertile will the duck lay them all at once or could they lay more than once within a few days?
     
  6. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member

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    Assuming that they are well-nourished, and get a decent dose of natural daylight every day (at least 8-10 hours) they will probably lay an egg every day or every other day, except for the 6-8 week period when they are moulting twice a year.

    see http://www.blurtit.com/q704990.html
    Female ducks become mature enough to begin laying eggs whenever they are 16 weeks old. Under the right conditions, most breeds of ducks can lay an egg every day or every other day. Ducks moult twice a year. Each moulting period lasts about 6 to 8 weeks. During this time, they are incapable of laying an egg. Having a drake living near the duck can enable the duck to lay more eggs than it normally would. In this situation, there is the risk of the eggs becoming fertilised by the drake.

    In order for the duck to lay the maximum amount of eggs, they must be properly cared for. Proper care of a duck involves providing food with adequate nutrition, having plenty of shelter from the weather. Ducks are also at risk for injury and disease and should be kept in a clean and safe area to minimise their risk. Ducks are social creatures; therefore they need love and affection in order to be happy. Having more than one duck or having constant interactions with a single duck is the best way to prevent loneliness and depression. Ducks enjoy being around water and love to play with toys. A happy and healthy duck is likely to produce more eggs.

    A duck’s laying habits depend a great deal on the quality of its living conditions. The quality of a duck’s lifestyle affects the quality of the eggs it produces. A highly nutritious diet and a disease-free lifestyle allow the duck to produce eggs of an optimal quality. The amount of affection a duck receives has a direct effect on its happiness. This in turn affects the amount of eggs it produces. Ultimately, it is the owner’s responsibility to ensure the duck has everything it needs to produce a large quantity of eggs.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2013

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