Fisher Cat in the neighborhood

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by They Call Me Pete, May 18, 2009.

  1. They Call Me Pete

    They Call Me Pete Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well came home from work the other day and saw a fisher cat run down stonewall with a squirrel in it's mouth. Going to install electric fence ASAP and I just started to leave doors open so they could let themselves in/out. Just another example of a great state agency with a bright idea. Introduce them to keep turkey population down. Well this year is the best turkey year and fishers killing anything they darn well please.
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    HUH? I don't know which is more mind boggling, introducing a species like fishers or wanting to control turkeys. What the heck is wrong with wild turkeys? And if there's a good reason to knock their numbers down and I'm just too dumb to figure it out, why not expand hunting to control them? Not enough interest in taking them in any number, or something?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2009
  3. greathorse

    greathorse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have never heard of a Fisher Cat until I found this site. What are the darn things. I just dont think we have them in Colorado. If we do they are not considered a problem.
     
  4. ga*chick*

    ga*chick* Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was wondering the same thing...what the heck is a fisher cat..
     
  5. jjdward

    jjdward How bout them DAWGS!

    May 4, 2009
    Buchanan, Georgia
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    I just did a image search on those things and they look like a demon coon/rat/otter [​IMG] I hope we don't have them here in the Peach State? Holly Smokes!!!!! [​IMG]
     
  6. ga*chick*

    ga*chick* Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Looks like an otter to me...never heard of them before.

    My first search turned up the NH baseball team..lol
     
  7. greathorse

    greathorse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I believe I have heard others speak of them in your state. GAWGA" that is. Not sure though
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2009
  8. Faverolle

    Faverolle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's actually fisher, not fisher cat. They are not related to cats but are in the weasel family. They range more or less from coast to coast and will prey on small domestic animals or small livestock if given the chance.
     
  9. greathorse

    greathorse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quite ferocioius from what I hear.
     
  10. They Call Me Pete

    They Call Me Pete Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:You have hit the nail on the head. We have literally one grey squirrel around our house and we are out in the country. I now no why. Someone told me that if hungry enough they will swipe a cat through a window screen. My neighbors had one climb up on their grill a few years back and sniff around.

    Sorry I couldn't get the picture to come through.

    The Fisher is a medium size member of the mustelid family often compared to the American Marten, a slightly smaller mustelid, due to many shared habits and characteristics. The "fisher-cat" is neither much of a fish catcher nor is it a member of the cat family though it does resemble a house cat in general body size and shape, but the fisher has shorter legs and a longer, wedge- shaped snout. The fur on a fisher is dark brown to black, as an animal ages the hair tips may become ‘frosted’, especially around the head and shoulders. They molt in the fall. Males generally have coarser hair coats, this makes the females more desirable to trappers. Their bodies measure 20 - 30 inches with an additional 13 - 17 inches of tail and weigh from 3 - 12 pounds. Males are usually significantly larger than the females. Tracks reveal 5 toes in a plantigrade foot averaging 3 in. wide by 4.5 in. long with thick fur on the soles of their feet in winter. The nails are at least partially retractable though not sheathed and the mustelid, 2x2 bounding gate is most common with fisher track patterns. (see tracking section for illustrations)

    Fishers are considered to be quite carnivorous, favoring snowshoe hares as well as squirrels, carrion, mice, shrews, voles, birds, fruits like berries, and ferns. They are also famous for their ability to successfully hunt and kill porcupines. One of the very few other animals to prey on porcupines is a close cousin of the fisher, the wolverine. The fishers’ long, wedge-shaped snout is well suited for making vicious attacks to the porcupines face until mortal wounds cause the porcupine to succumb. In some forests, fishers have been reintroduced to try to control porcupine populations. This biological control method has been successful at least for short-term population reductions; it is currently unknown how well it works for long-term porcupine population control. They generally hunt by systematically searching for patches of abundant prey and then systematically searching those patches for prey to kill. Fishers will sometimes cache food items and find/make temporary den sites near large food items like a deer carcass.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2009

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