flat roof to sloped roof

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Vickir73, Sep 20, 2011.

  1. Vickir73

    Vickir73 Chickens Ate My Brain

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    Sep 9, 2010
    Leggett/Livingston
    I have to replace the flat roof on my "baby" coop (right now everyone is 2 months old). It's got a 20+year old flat roof on it that leaks like a sieve. Here are the materials I have. LOTS of 2X4s (these were all free I just need to remove nails), LOTS of shingles, rolls of tar paper, and I can get plywood or OSB. I prefer plywood; however, please feel free, if after I list my questions, if I could get cheaper OSB (even though I think it's not that much cheaper), and lots of tin that has small nail holes/ rust spots in it.

    (1) I've been looking for detailed instructions/pictures on how to convert the flat roof into a sloped roof and am not having any luck. (I do have an idea of what I'd like it to look like in my head.) I know I would probably need to add 2 feet of height to the front (it will slope to the back). From my measurements and guess work (anytime I do math it's a guesswork) with adding 2 feet to the front, the slope will be enough so rain will run off. We don't have a problem with snow in East Texas [​IMG] and right now we don't have a problem with rain either!!

    (2) can anyone direct me to their favorite links with pics that show a roof in progress or know of a website I could go to. I do have the chicken coops for dummies book at home, but I am a visual person and understand so much better if I can see a picture.

    (3) I've read some people just nail tin onto the wood rafters; however, my tin is leaky and since I'm under a money restraint was wondering if I could use plywood then shingles then tin. or if I use plywood and shingles, just forgo the tine?

    (4) what is a drip ridge? (is this the correct terminology?) Would someone have a close up pic? Is this where I would just leave the shingle overhanging the plywood? If so, whats to keep the rain from running under the bottom of the shingles (or tin for that matter) and getting between the shingles/tin and plywood? I think I read that someone put tar on the edges of the plywood?

    Thank y'all for any responses. In the meantime, I will keep reading and looking
     
  2. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

  3. fireguy56

    fireguy56 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Vickir73, Hi..if ya could post a photo showing what you have currently, it would help folks to reply with suggestions for you. Just a thought.
    Erik
     
  4. Vickir73

    Vickir73 Chickens Ate My Brain

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    Sep 9, 2010
    Leggett/Livingston
    thank you teach1!!! I think I'll do exactly that. build me a 2-3 foot frame to add to the top of my south wall and then do my birdmouth cuts. However, and this may be a stupid question. How do I keep the water from getting into the edges of the roof? I can't see the close up of the edges of your roof very wall. Do you do anything special? I'll lay my plywood on top then add tar paper, then shingles. I'll take some before pics of the roof this weekend. I did this project backwards. I've already redesigned the walls and now will tackle the roof. (I was hoping the roof wasn't in as bad as condition as it actually is)
     
  5. Vickir73

    Vickir73 Chickens Ate My Brain

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    Sep 9, 2010
    Leggett/Livingston
    I will take some pics of the current roof this evening and post tomorrow along with the measurements. I will also try to include the pics on my BYC page (I have before and after shots of the sides and main coop I need to upload to by BYC page anyway)
     
  6. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    Quote:Let me know if I misunderstood your question. After I nailed plywood down onto the rafters, I added strips of "drip edge" all the way around before I put my shingles on. That drip edge stuff is pretty cheap - I got mine from Home Depot.
     
  7. Agdketo

    Agdketo Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 14, 2009
    Aledo, Illinois
    I would have to say the best and easiest way to convert your roof from a flat roof, would be to build trusses with the 2x4s that you have. it's pretty simple. you just have to figure out the pitch you want the roof to be at. but that's only if you're going to convert it from a flat roof to a gable roof. This is a link to see different roof types. http://www.centralohiohomeinspector.com/Roofs.html This is a link for truss types. http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...TN7TsL-JdGWtweF6azqDw&ved=0CCsQ9QEwAQ&dur=421



    I hope this helps you.
     
  8. Vickir73

    Vickir73 Chickens Ate My Brain

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    Sep 9, 2010
    Leggett/Livingston
    Here are pics of what it looks like now. Although in the one picture it does look slanted, it's not, or it's not enough to make a difference. I was thinking about raising it on the one end 2 feet. Is that going to be enough though? The plan is to build a new frame for the top that would include some rafters so I can hang my waters and feeders and include a 2 foot rise on the north side (the side that facing the camera) with beams going from north to south. Then 1/2 plywood, then shingles. (does this make sense?)


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  9. wyoDreamer

    wyoDreamer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We just built a "roof on a fence" this weekend - basically what you are talking about, but our fence was a privacy fence we are using to make a storage area. My husband wrapped the exposed ends of the OSB with a "window flashing" that we had bought when we changed out our sliding patio door. We bought new corrugated tin to cover the roof.

    The window flashing was about 8" wide and came on a roll. Basically this is a material that is foil on one side, some sort of thick black material (think tar, but more solid) and a sticky side that is covered in paper to keep it from sticking to itself. You pull off the paper and when you press it down, it will stick to the OSB/plywood and keep the water off of the wood. We bought ours at Lowes when we bought the door.

    DH wrapped the low side of the OSB in this material, then put on the roofing felt, then wrapped the high side with this material so that it goes over the roof felt. Then he installed the tin on top. Any moisture that gets under the tin, will flow down the roof felt and the drip line of the OSB is protected by the foil on the flashing.

    Clear as mud, right?

    If your tin has holes in it, I would just use the shingles. Otherwise, you would have to buy tar and seal all those holes up to keep the moisture out. Shingles are designed to keep moisture off the wood parts of the roof all by themselves. Putting tin over the shingles will just put holes into the shingles and let water in.
     
  10. rpchris

    rpchris Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 27, 2011
    Saint Louis, MO
    Disclaimer: I tend to overbuild because I hate when things fall down, especially when I'm standing under them, use your own sound judgement for your lumber choices.

    It's hard to tell from the picture how the existing structure is framed.

    Make sure your header beams on the North and South sides are well supported because they will be carrying the entire weight of the roof and anything on the roof. If you are putting shingles up instead of metal, then the roof is going to get really heavy. The header beams should probably be dual 2x10s carriage-bolted onto the columns (one board on each side). Those columns also need to be rock solid and plumb so they don't kick out sideways.

    Frame up a box 2 or 3 feet high on the north side with another 2x10 header. Tie it tightly to the lower header and brace it to the East and West walls so it doesn't move. Then run 2x8s or 2x10s from the North end to the South end, spaced every 16" or so. Then screw down the plywood over that to tie it all together (I think screws hold better than nails). Staple roofing felt over that. Nail on the drip edge if you are using one. Then nail on the shingles.

    If everything is well supported it should last 25 years or more, if not just hope you're not under it when it decides to come down. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2011

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