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flight pens

Discussion in 'Pheasants and Partridge (Chukar)' started by beckyschicks, Jan 5, 2011.

  1. beckyschicks

    beckyschicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 22, 2009
    Iron Ridge WI
    Pending my licensing: I would like to raise and release ringnecks. Now I was just wondering what experiences people have had as far as sucess? I'm planning on having a flight pen that is a min of 50x50, for about 30 birds. There will be lots of natural cover and the surounding areas are woods, farm fields, and natural wetlands. My plan is to release about 20ish in the first year keeping a male or two and the rest hens, for the following year to breed. I've done some digging, but can't seem to find much about people's experiences with releasing. Also I have read in the sticky that they can get water in the winter from the snow, should I provide another water source for them or would this be enough. Any suggestions would be helpful. Thanks
     
  2. SamG347

    SamG347 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 4, 2007
    PA
    This question has been covered in another thread but I will answer a few questions for you.

    1. 50 by 50 will be plenty big for 30 ringnecks.
    2. It sounds like you have great habitat for ringnecks but when it boils down to it will the survive and breed...nobody can answer that 100%. If you put out enough birds which would be around 100 a year I would say you would start to notice an increase in the population around...but that would be because you are stocking the population that exhists already after your first release. I would let the birds go around 6-7 weeks old so they are old enough to fly and fully feathered...but still not too dependent on you. Feed them grain on the ground and allow them to hunt in the flight pen for insects and eat native grasses. They will be able to get enough water when released from your swamp and or puddles that accumulate in the fields. But in the flight pen I would provide them with a waterer.
    3. They can and will use snow as a water source and will also burrow down in it in extreme cold to be insulated.
    4. Keep 1 male and 6-7 hens for breeding if you decide to do so. And make sure to watch for picking during breeding season.
    5. DO NOT USE CHINESE RINGNECKS for your release...try to find Kansas...Mongolian...or Manchurian stock. Mongolians/Kansas can also be called Bluebacks.

    Anymore questions feel free to PM me. I have raised a few hundred pheasants and I'm no beginner when it comes to gamebirds.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. beckyschicks

    beckyschicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 22, 2009
    Iron Ridge WI
    Thank you. That helps. Unfortunatly I really don't have alot of experience with pheasants so everything helps. The first year will be a hands on learning experience as the internet can only teach you so much. This is why I will only be doing 30 birds in the first year. The numbers will grow as my experience does. Question though- Do you usually see them say close to "home" or not? How far should I release them from the flight pen? Thanks again.
     
  4. SamG347

    SamG347 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 4, 2007
    PA
    I see them around now and then. Your local hawk...fox...coon..and yote population will really determine how many you see. If you can I would just open the flight pen up and let them go out when they want. Sit and watch it won't take them long to realize they are "free" and if they are anything like my pheasants will take off after only taking 3 or 4 steps out of the pen.
     
  5. SamG347

    SamG347 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 4, 2007
    PA
  6. beckyschicks

    beckyschicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    129
    Sep 22, 2009
    Iron Ridge WI
    Thank you again. I'm going to check that site out. I'm sure you can and this has probably been asked, but since I have you here. Can I successfully sex them at 6-8 wks?
     
  7. SamG347

    SamG347 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 4, 2007
    PA
    I'm pretty good at sexing pheasants as day olds....and yes around 8 weeks of age youl should be able to tell male from female..even younger depending. When the time comes and you can get some good pictures of the chicks faces I will be able to help you out.
    [​IMG]
     
  8. beckyschicks

    beckyschicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 22, 2009
    Iron Ridge WI
    Thank you so much again! I'll be in touch come April. That site is great an I like how they feel about quality. Thanks again!
     
  9. ranit

    ranit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 14, 2010
    Illinois
    By six-eight weeks the males are starting to get some color on their chests so easy to sex. We've released some the past couple of years. We did as Sam suggested and just opened the door. We would see them for awhile but then as time went on no more but then I live in southern Illinois and our conservation dept. can't even get them established in our area. They told my husband that the number one predator for pheasants is hawks and we just have too many in our area.
     
  10. Birch Run Farm

    Birch Run Farm Biddy up!

    Sep 5, 2008
    VERMONT
    Yep, hawks will kill all of them. They are very persistant. [​IMG]
     

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