1. colandjulie

    colandjulie Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 22, 2008
    Hi all,

    After our Cock disaster a couplr of weeks ago we decided to just go for a couple of extra hens to increase our flock.

    We bought a couple of Pekin Bantams to match the ones we have, from the same place we originally got our first lot.

    However we have noticed these are not in anywhere near as good condition as the first batch.

    Our main concern is that the Lilac one keeps producing a foam on her right eye. She also seems to be "sneezing" although it isn't really like a sneeze. More like she is trying to exhale quickly. She is eating fine and obviously still in segregation from the other 3 (although with her friend we got at the same time) so we are not too worried at the moment, just a bit concerned with the whole foamy eye thing.

    The foam just sits on the outside of her eye and obscures her vision. When I wipe it away her eyes seem nice and bright and she is plenty active.

    So, any ideas people?Really relying on you guys/gals before we start to spend fortunes with our local vet.

    Cheers

    Col and Julie.
     
  2. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    Jan 18, 2008
    Newman Lake, WA
    She either has bronchitis or ILT.

    You can have your vet do a throat swab on her and send it in to the avian lab to confirm.

    It shouldn't be that expensive.

    Both of these diseases are contagious and if it is ILT I would suggest getting rid of the bird.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2008
  3. colandjulie

    colandjulie Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 22, 2008
    ILT???
     
  4. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    Jan 18, 2008
    Newman Lake, WA
    Quote:Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute, highly contagious, herpesvirus infection of chickens and pheasants characterized by severe dyspnea, coughing, and rales. It can also be a subacute disease with lacrimation, tracheitis, conjunctivitis, and mild rales. It has been reported from most areas of the USA in which poultry are intensively reared, as well as from many other countries.
    Clinical Findings:
    In the acute form, gasping, coughing, rattling, and extension of the neck during inspiration are seen 5-12 days after natural exposure. Reduced productivity is a varying factor in laying flocks. Affected birds are anorectic and inactive. The mouth and beak may be bloodstained from the tracheal exudate. Mortality varies, but may reach 50% in adults, and is usually due to occlusion of the trachea by hemorrhage or exudate. Signs usually subside after ~2 wk, although birds may cough for 1 mo. Strains of low virulence produce little or no mortality with slight respiratory signs and lesions and a slight decrease in egg production.
    After recovery, some birds remain carriers for extended periods and become a source of infection for susceptible birds. The latent virus can be reactivated under stressful conditions. Infection also may be spread mechanically. Several epidemics have been traced to the transport of birds in contaminated crates.

    Diagnosis:


    Infectious laryngotracheitis, chicken


    The acute disease is characterized by the clinical signs and by finding blood, mucus, and yellow caseous exudate or a hollow caseous cast in the trachea. Microscopically, a desquamative, necrotizing tracheitis is characteristic. In the subacute form, punctiform hemorrhagic areas in the trachea and larynx, and conjunctivitis with lacrimation permit a presumptive diagnosis. In uncomplicated cases, the air sacs usually are not involved. The diagnosis may be confirmed by demonstrating intranuclear inclusion bodies in the tracheal epithelium early in the course of the disease; by isolating and identifying the specific virus in chick embryos, tissue culture, or chickens; or by inoculating the infraorbital sinus or vent of known immune and susceptible birds. Chicken embryos (9-12 days old) are preferred for virus isolation. Chorioallantoic membrane of developing chicken embryos is inoculated with the specimen. Microscopic examination of the chorioallantoic membrane lesion shows intranuclear inclusions. ILT must be differentiated from the diphtheritic form of fowlpox (Fowlpox), especially with tracheal lesions. Fowlpox virus produces intracytoplasmic inclusions.
    Field isolates and vaccine strains of ILT virus can be compared by restriction endonuclease analysis of viral genomes. This method is useful for comparing closely related DNA genomes and in the epidemiology of the disease. However, significant differences may not be apparent between field and vaccine strains of ILT virus.
    Nucleic acid probes prepared from cloned genomic fragments of ILT virus can also be used for diagnosis. This procedure is especially useful for differentiation of ILT from the diphtheritic form of fowlpox with tracheal lesions.
    PCR, which can amplify ILT virus genomic DNA sequences of various sizes using specific primers, is useful when an extremely small amount of viral DNA is present in the sample. Restriction fragment length polymorphism of PCR products with restriction enzymes can be used to differentiate strains.

    Prevention and Treatment:
    Some relief from signs is obtained by keeping the birds quiet, lowering the dust level, and using mild expectorants, being careful that they do not contaminate feed or water. Vaccination should be practiced in endemic areas and on farms where a specific diagnosis is made. Immediate vaccination of adults in the face of an outbreak shortens the course of the disease. Vaccination is best done with modified strains of low virulence applied to the conjunctiva (eye drop). Results are less consistent with mass methods of vaccination such as spray or drinking water administration. Broiler flocks in some areas where the disease is endemic must be vaccinated when young, but this is unlikely to be effective if done at <4 wk of age. Some vaccine producers recommend revaccination when birds are to be held to maturity. Recently, a recombinant fowlpox virus-vectored vaccine expressing genes from ILT virus has become available commercially.
     
  5. colandjulie

    colandjulie Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 22, 2008
    Eeek!

    Looks like we will be down the vets tomorrow and back to the bloody place that supplied them shortly after.

    Being in the UK I can feel a call to the RSPCA coming on!
     
  6. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    Jan 18, 2008
    Newman Lake, WA
    Make sure you get the diagnosis first.
     

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