Food for injured rooster

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by TheChickenQueen, Dec 15, 2014.

  1. TheChickenQueen

    TheChickenQueen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a rooster who narrowly escaped getting killed by my dog about 2 weeks ago, he lost a lot of his feathers, and a few bits of skin, then he had some punchers on his back. He is doing quiet well, no sign of infection and he is healing nicely. But my birds had lost some weight before the attack. And he was one of them, then for a little while he was not eating.

    He started eating again and acting more lively. But he is now considerably light and there is no heat where he is at so I feel like that is burning through what he does eat.

    Is there anything that will help him gain weight at a good pace and keep him healthy? (btw his water has electrolytes and vitamins in it)

    I apologize if this is a dumb question, I'm just really worried.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2014
  2. pdirt

    pdirt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What are you feeding him? Type and percentage of feed and any treats? You will want to boost protein to help him regain his feathers.

    Since your whole flock is losing weight, check your protein. If you're feeding a 16% protein feed, it may not be enough for your cold climate. Do they all otherwise look healthy? Any sign of worms, mites or lice?
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2014
  3. TheChickenQueen

    TheChickenQueen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Right now he is eating layer feed, I think it is 16% protein. They have enough to eat all day. He and his fellow survivor both get treats.

    They look healthy, there is no sign of worms, mites, or lice.
     
  4. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    I would suggest switching your entire flock over to a grower ration - the higher protein will benefit the birds and the non-laying birds (males, females that are not laying due to age or molt, etc) will not be at risk of damage from the increased calcium content of layer ration. To provide the calcium needed by birds who are actively producing eggs you can simply offer oyster shell on the side as a free choice supplement.

    ETA - what "treats" are you feeding? Many of the treats commonly given to flocks are very low in protein content and when combined with the already low-end of the protein spectrum layer rations can result in a diet insufficient in protein.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2014
  5. TheChickenQueen

    TheChickenQueen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was thinking about doing that, but my pullet who is with him shows no interest in oyster shells.

    Lately, cabbage, noddles, scrambled eggs, the occasional canned corn when it is not all eaten. I try not to give them stuff them stuff they won't really eat, lettuces, apples, etc.
     
  6. pdirt

    pdirt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree with ol grey mare..try switching to a grower feed with oyster shell on the side. He needs more protein than 16% while he is healing. If you haven't tried this before it was likely your pullet (I assume she is laying eggs) wasn't interested in the oyster shell because she was getting enough calcium from the layer feed. Reduce her calcium in the form of grower feed and she will pick up a taste for oyster shell, especially if she's laying.

    Some folks feed their roosters layer feed because its easier than putting out a seperate dish for the oyster shells. It *is* hard on a roosters kidneys to eat that much calcium on an on-going basis. If you plan to butcher the rooster in the not too distant future, I wouldn't worry about it. If you want to keep him in his best health, get rid of the layer feed.

    Even if you don't plan to switch to grower+shells full time, consider it while he is healing up.

    Also, all of those treats are low protein. Well, the eggs have some but not as much as you'd think. Low protein treats will dilute 16% feed, which equals not enough daily protein, especially when trying to grow back feathers. 16% protein is the bare minimum protein chickens can live on. Limit low protein treats and add in higher protein treats like BOSS, ground beef, a tin of mackerel or mealworms.
     
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  7. TheChickenQueen

    TheChickenQueen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She is laying, and still is surprisingly. Alright, I'll have to get a hold of some grower feed next time I go into town. Can they have chick starter? I have a incubator due to hatch on Christmas and if they can all eat the same thing that would be great!

    I'm not planning on butchering him, I keep my good roos, and he was one.

    I'll look into those high protein treats.
     
  8. pdirt

    pdirt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, starter feed will be great for everyone. Some folks feed starter or grower from hatch to death. Just be sure to have a calcium source, like crushed oyster shells, for the layers. Since its probably about 20% protein, after your roo is healed up, you could feed more low protein treats to him (and other adults) if you want.
     
  9. TheChickenQueen

    TheChickenQueen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay, thank you! That helps a lot!
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    I like to feed an 'all flock' 20% protein crumble to all ages and genders. Makes life much simpler to store and distribute one type of chow that everyone can eat and have calcium available at all times for the layers, oyster shell mixed with rinsed, dried, crushed chicken egg shells in a separate container.

    The higher protein crumble offsets the 8% protein scratch grains and other kitchen/garden scraps I like to offer.
     

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