Food Question

Kraeuterelfe

In the Brooder
7 Years
Mar 27, 2012
55
3
33
Can it be the food?

We noticed several things in the last time

- some of the Hens and one Rooster look like they are not coming out of molting, it almost looks like the lost feathers are not growing back at all and there are way more feathers flying around then the years before
- egg production is unusual low (no rooster overpopulation)
- some ladies are now over 7 month and have not started laying yet
- they are free range, with pellet food, grit and oyster shells available 24/7, chicken coop open/close at dawn/dusk
- no diarrhea, vomiting, lethargy, no parasites

We asked the Feed Store where we buy this food and they said, that they have heard the same thing from other customers, too. And after switching to a different food (sure more expensive ;-)), all this would disappear. They recommended 'PayBack'.
The pellet food we are using now is locally made.

Any thoughts?
 

bargain

Love God, Hubby & farm
11 Years
Apr 13, 2008
8,372
425
326
Bowdon, GA
Can it be the food?

We noticed several things in the last time

- some of the Hens and one Rooster look like they are not coming out of molting, it almost looks like the lost feathers are not growing back at all and there are way more feathers flying around then the years before
- egg production is unusual low (no rooster overpopulation)
- some ladies are now over 7 month and have not started laying yet
- they are free range, with pellet food, grit and oyster shells available 24/7, chicken coop open/close at dawn/dusk
- no diarrhea, vomiting, lethargy, no parasites

We asked the Feed Store where we buy this food and they said, that they have heard the same thing from other customers, too. And after switching to a different food (sure more expensive ;-)), all this would disappear. They recommended 'PayBack'.
The pellet food we are using now is locally made.

Any thoughts?

Feed can make a difference on laying, most definitely! But light plays a key factor at this time of year, with reduction in day light hours, you can expect less eggs. Also we had a rough year one year with feed that was locally milled and the hoppers had not been cleaned out properly and we sent the feed to be evaluated by our ag school and it wa toxic with overly high levels of salt. We lost quite a few poultry because of the salt. Happily we noticed that they were drinking way too much water and thi was our cue to the issue. Some chickens also don't lay until month 8 or 9 but that will depend upon the breed.
 

Kraeuterelfe

In the Brooder
7 Years
Mar 27, 2012
55
3
33
Thanks!

Would the light influence the molting as well?

I am less concerned about the egg production, the girls deserve a break ;-)

It is more the feathers....Winter is coming .......

And if they are missing something in the food, we would like to change this.
 

Den in Penn

Songster
8 Years
Dec 15, 2011
3,418
217
216
SE Pa.
Light can influence the start of molt. The shorting of day light triggers it. Feed also plays a role in the role of the molt cycle. The proper nutrients protein helps the regrowth of feathers and the recovery of body condition. A lot of people chose to add more protein during this time to speed it along.
 

Kraeuterelfe

In the Brooder
7 Years
Mar 27, 2012
55
3
33
Thanks!

Our FeedStore offers Egg Layer Pellets from

- Protein min 9.5%, Fat min 2.9%, Fiber max 3%, Ash max 15%

up to

- Protein 20%, Fat 2.2%, Fiber 3%,

How much protein is recommended?
 

Kraeuterelfe

In the Brooder
7 Years
Mar 27, 2012
55
3
33
Thanks!

We already switched to the 20% protein food.

Would it be a good idea to add live mealworms in the next days as well, or is this to much protein? ;-)
 

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