FOODS GUINEAS CAN AND CAN'T EAT

Sydney65

Crowing
Aug 2, 2019
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I actually have tried to pick up some bugs and earthworms for them when I can, we have tons of ladybugs lately. We also have a ton of slugs, but I heard the sticky residue can bother their throat? We don't have much winter to speak of, so things grow here well all year, I just need to figure what is good. Do sunflower seeds need to be peeled? We are just getting some pumpkins out of the fields now.
Author/breeder Gail Damerow:
"Chicken starter ration (“chick starter”) is available in most locations. Starter rations are higher in protein and lower in calories than rations designed for older poultry. Never feed layer ration to babies, even as an emergency measure if you run out of starter; the higher calcium content of the layer ration can seriously damage young kidneys. If you do run out of starter, or you forget to pick some up before your hatchlings arrive, you can make an emergency starter ration by cracking scratch grains in the blender or, if you have no scratch, by running a little uncooked oatmeal through the blender and mixing it 50/50 with cornmeal. Grains are high in calories and low in the protein, vitamins, and minerals needed for good growth and health, so don’t use this mixture any longer than a day or two. If you have extra eggs on hand, mashed hard-boiled or scrambled egg makes an excellent starter ration.
In the old days before commercial rations were available, farmers typically started their chicks on mashed boiled eggs. After the first few days, chicks were fed oatmeal and cracked grains until they got big enough to forage for themselves. Baby birds that are fed cracked grains also need grit, provided in a separate feeder. If your local farm store doesn’t carry chick grit, a suitable substitute is cage-bird grit from a pet store or clean sand from a builder’s supply."
 

Sydney65

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Never use medicated chick starter for guineas though. This was from the current book I'm reading- she wrote that she uses chick starter, unmedicated, & boosted for more protein. It isn't the gold standard, but you do what you gotta do between feeding them what's available and supplementing or letting them starve bc you can't obtain the gold standard, right? 🤷‍♀️
 

R2elk

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Never use medicated chickvstarter for guineas though.
@PeepsCA who was a guinea expert recommended to use medicated turkey or game bird starter for keets. I would never use chick starter for keets whether or not it is medicated.

The reason for not recommending a medicated starter for keets is because the starter medication is typically amprolium which is a thiamine blocker. Thiamine is one of the necessary vitamins for healthy growth in keets.
 

Sydney65

Crowing
Aug 2, 2019
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@PeepsCA who was a guinea expert recommended to use medicated turkey or game bird starter for keets. I would never use chick starter for keets whether or not it is medicated.

The reason for not recommending a medicated starter for keets is because the starter medication is typically amprolium which is a thiamine blocker. Thiamine is one of the necessary vitamins for healthy growth in keets.
In this specific case, she can't get turkey/gamebird starter even shipped to her. So while not the gold standard, it's better than nothing, right?
I respect Peep's experience- at the same time, what I'm reading is that it is unwise to use medicated feed as a preventative, given the risk of building up a tolerance in the protozoa. Given that the same is true w/antibiotics & many bug killers, & you beating it into my head not to use it ever, I'm unlikely to change my mind at this point. 😉
I am curious about the use of prebiotics & the idea that they trick pathogens into attaching to them rather than the intestinal wall, then being expelled in waste. However, the list given may spark debate.."Natural sources of prebiotics include chicory root, jicama, Jerusalem artichoke, asparagus, garlic, onions, dandelion greens, bananas, legumes (soybeans, lentils, kidney beans, chickpeas), wheat, barley, and raw oats."
 

Naverretia

In the Brooder
Jan 23, 2021
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Well I hope I didn't kill all my keets. The feed we had was only 12% protein and 2% calcium, I finally found a feed a couple weeks ago with 16% but I think the calcium is 4%. I guess I'm starting over again. The last time I asked them for some sort of game bird starter they gave me a bag with a pigeon on it and feed that looked like this. I never gave it to the very young ones because I didn't think they could manage the large seeds yet.
51B8DbgkesL._AC_SY1000_.jpg
 

Naverretia

In the Brooder
Jan 23, 2021
32
49
46
All my keets still seem happy and healthy. I think people have asked before, but I have a lot of guinea eggs that I incubated this last week that are still totally clear, so I think they stopped getting busy. Do you think it would be dangerous to boil the unfertilized ones and feed them to the guineas? I know people eat balut and such so I am not really sure how bad it is. As long as they smell okay would it be safe for them? Or should they go to the pigs or the trash?
 

R2elk

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Feb 24, 2013
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All my keets still seem happy and healthy. I think people have asked before, but I have a lot of guinea eggs that I incubated this last week that are still totally clear, so I think they stopped getting busy. Do you think it would be dangerous to boil the unfertilized ones and feed them to the guineas? I know people eat balut and such so I am not really sure how bad it is. As long as they smell okay would it be safe for them? Or should they go to the pigs or the trash?
Some people regularly boil the unfertilized eggs and feed them back to their poultry after chopping them up.
 

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
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All my keets still seem happy and healthy. I think people have asked before, but I have a lot of guinea eggs that I incubated this last week that are still totally clear, so I think they stopped getting busy. Do you think it would be dangerous to boil the unfertilized ones and feed them to the guineas? I know people eat balut and such so I am not really sure how bad it is. As long as they smell okay would it be safe for them? Or should they go to the pigs or the trash?
I have an old poultry-raising book (about a century old) that recommends keeping such eggs until the chicks hatch, then cooking them as scrambled eggs to feed to the chicks.

I have cooked up infertile eggs to feed to chickens, and I seriously considered eating them myself because they seemed fine. (I didn't eat them, but I'm keeping it in mind in case I ever am short of eggs for eating.)

I wanted to double-check whether there were any signs of development, and I wanted to make sure the eggs had not gone bad, so I cracked each egg into a pan and then cooked them all up. They weren't quite scrambled eggs because I didn't bother to stir them, but the chickens and the dog weren't picky.
 

Naverretia

In the Brooder
Jan 23, 2021
32
49
46
I have an old poultry-raising book (about a century old) that recommends keeping such eggs until the chicks hatch, then cooking them as scrambled eggs to feed to the chicks.

I have cooked up infertile eggs to feed to chickens, and I seriously considered eating them myself because they seemed fine. (I didn't eat them, but I'm keeping it in mind in case I ever am short of eggs for eating.)

I wanted to double-check whether there were any signs of development, and I wanted to make sure the eggs had not gone bad, so I cracked each egg into a pan and then cooked them all up. They weren't quite scrambled eggs because I didn't bother to stir them, but the chickens and the dog weren't picky.
Yeah that makes sense, perhaps I should have scrambled them, but the ones I took out were totally clear so I think I won't have any surprises when I peel them 🤣
 

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