? For the Experts

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by flgardengirl, Dec 27, 2010.

  1. flgardengirl

    flgardengirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Suppose you had several different breeds and put them all together. How many years would it take for them to become one breed? I hope this isn't too dumb of a question lol.
     
  2. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

    Many, many generations.
     
  3. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    Well it depends what breeds you put together and what you want. For example, a lot of traits are recessive, some are dominant enough to work with after many out-crossings, and then there's things like behavior, egg-laying, and weight to really keep watch of.

    With true dedication, and focused, organized breeding to your own standard - It should take 5 years or more.

    With a small goal in mind, it may just take 1-2 years.
     
  4. flgardengirl

    flgardengirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Should/would the final product have all the same traits...like rose comb vs straight combs, color patterns, etc. or can there be little groups with different variations depending on how the chickens pair up or form into thier own little flocks?
     
  5. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    If we're talking like that, (just letting chickens do their own job, not intervening at all) - It is going to take a LONG time before an actual breed forms. Look at even small villages with chickens, there's still too much variation to call them a "breed." I'd say in the end you'll get something true if you have a small place, but if you have a large area to pasture or free range them on, you may get some groups to split up. And that, yes, is what determines there being one breed or several variations. But, either way, it will take a while. (depending too, of course, on how different your starter birds are)
     
  6. flgardengirl

    flgardengirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay I am thinking of the 'wild' type island birds like the key west chickens that have been breeding for (I've read) for 175 years or more. I read that the pirates and Cuban, Spanish, and Puerto Rican immigrants brought thier game birds over on ships to Key West and they all went feral and have been running loose and interbreeding ever since.
    I suppose that other chickens have gotten loose and intermingled here and there as well. I have seen lots of color patterns and also pea and straight combs from these birds.
    I know there is a group working on getting them APA approved in 5-10 yrs or so. Just trying to get some information/feedback on possiblilities lol. I know other breeds I've seen, like the Icelandics for example, also have quite a variation of colors, combs etc.
     
  7. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

    I'm not a genetics expert....far from it, but unless you are selectively breeding for certain traits I'm not sure you'd ever end up with a uniform bird if that is your goal. I would think the variations in those breeds you mentioned come from the fact that they have been being bred willy nilly all those years without human intervention.....especially the Key West birds...nor sure on the Icelandics.
     
  8. pinkchick

    pinkchick "Ain't nuttin' like having da' blues"

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    Quote:Would this be considered a Landrace Fowl like the Icelandics (no standardization)......didn't all domestic chickens originate from landrace fowl?
     
  9. flgardengirl

    flgardengirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I appreciate all the insight given thus far. The lady I adopted my Key West chickens from is part of the Rescue group. She told me when they get pure white chickens they know that they came from the Key West Cemetary area. Isn't that interesting and kinda eerie?
     
  10. danhonour

    danhonour Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know of some cases were chickens were left behind and became ferral.Then it was survival of the fittest and in time the smaller birds,with the wild type duckwing color prevailed.Reminding one of larger bantam BBRed OEG.This taking about 5 years.
     

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