For the roof, does metal bend?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Zahboo, Feb 12, 2009.

  1. Zahboo

    Zahboo Simply Stated

    Feb 3, 2009
    Hope Mills, NC
    I know that's a weird way to say it, but the store has a 9' tin corrugated that would work great! I was wondering if it could bend, so I wouldn't have to cut it. Like just put it over the a frame and nail it down where it's even on both sides.
     
  2. brooster

    brooster Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 14, 2007
    northwest Ohio
    if its metal it could be bent, but its better cut.
     
  3. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 31, 2008
    Grifton NC
    You can bend it some the long way, but NOT across the ridges.

    If the "A" frame is wide enough, you may be able to make it work
     
  4. Chicken Fried

    Chicken Fried Out Of The Brooder

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    Northeast Wisconsin
    I think it would be better if you cut it, then you could put a ridge vent across the top and help ventilate the coop.
     
  5. HeartLunger

    HeartLunger Out Of The Brooder

    Quote:You may want to check out Metal flashing, instead. It comes in several widths and lengths, and because it is not corrugated would be much easier to bend and would give you straighter lines.
     
  6. sugarbush

    sugarbush Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lexington KY
    Do you own a circularsaw? Take the blade off and put it back on backwards. Then you can cut the steel roofing like cake.
     
  7. Chickenfortress

    Chickenfortress Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:or better yet spend the $5 and get a friction blade thats made for it. That way you don't ruin your blade, clothes, face and hands with all the small, hot shards of metal flying at you. Also, if you forgot safety goggles, you will get to meet a nice doctor with a magnet who will be ever so helpful. Friction blade! or a cutoff blade made for metal. Or tinsnips. At the very least, if you intend to use a wood blade reversed to cut steel don't use a carbide blade... ouch!
     
  8. azelgin

    azelgin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 18, 2008
    S.E. AZ
    Quote:or better yet spend the $5 and get a friction blade thats made for it. That way you don't ruin your blade, clothes, face and hands with all the small, hot shards of metal flying at you. Also, if you forgot safety goggles, you will get to meet a nice doctor with a magnet who will be ever so helpful. Friction blade! or a cutoff blade made for metal. Or tinsnips. At the very least, if you intend to use a wood blade reversed to cut steel don't use a carbide blade... ouch!

    Buy the friction blade. I've cut metal roofing with plywood blades, standard metal blades, carbide blades and just about any other kind that will fit my Skill 77. They work. Backwards, or forwards. Lots of hot flying metal. Wear hearing and eye protection if you use these. The friction blades are the best way to go.[​IMG]
     
  9. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Ontario, Canada
    Yeah, don't try bending it across the ribs, you'll just ruin it (if you press hard enough to get it to bend it will bend any whichway and you'll get little rips and pinholes in the metal anyhow).

    WEAR HEARING PROTECTION as well as eye protection when you cut it!

    (It *can* also be cut with ultra heavy duty manual tin snips, but I do not recommend this in terms of results for either your hand muscles or the quality of the cut. THough you could bury the raggedy ends under the flashing you'll need to put along the ridge.)

    (Someone here told me that there is some sort of purpose made electric snipper thingie that is extremely good for cutting metal sheets, but it wouldn't be worth trying to find one to rent for just an A-frame)

    Good luck, have fun, watch them sparks fly <g>,

    Pat
     

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