Forgive me if this is a dumb question...

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by flspnr, Oct 16, 2011.

  1. flspnr

    flspnr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm new to chickens all together. I got 2 bantams, randomly picked by who I thought was pretty enough to be a girl, and they both were! Someone else gave me a gorgeous white chicken, Snowflake, a bantam as well. This morning, Snowflake started to crow! Ooops.

    I didn't want a rooster since I didn't want the neighbors to complain. We're going to try for the moment keeping him inside at night to muffle the sound, and he'll be outside with the girls all day (10am to 8ish pm). We have another neighbor, next neighborhood over, with a rooster, but he's quiet enough he doesn't bother anyone. I think having one would be ok if I can keep him quiet at night/early morning. One neighbor, the one who I was talking to when we heard him trying to crow, already said she doesn't care. She's a country girl. [​IMG]

    Anyways, onto my question....

    IF we keep him, and IF we let the self blue OE go broody (will she even?), what will I have as a result? The Roo is a White OE. I know it won't be a pure color, right? But it would be a pure OE, just not a standard color? Would I get a light blue OE? Some blue and some white? All white?

    Still unsure if we would let them hatch chicks. But, I'd be curious to know what they would be if we did! Thanks!!

    ETA: That's him in my picture. That was taken a couple of weeks ago, before the big red combs and wattles showed up. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2011
  2. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You will get black offspring.

    Tim
     
  3. flspnr

    flspnr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Black? Cool. [​IMG]

    Can you explain why, or is it complicated? I don't know much about genetics, lol.

    Thanks for your reply!!
     
  4. chickendales

    chickendales Chillin' With My Peeps

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    you can also get a bird that is white but not quite pure white
     
  5. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Both of the parents are black under their color. The genes that cause the blue and the white are recessive. One white gene and the one self blue gene( actually called lavender) that the offspring inherit will not make the offspring white or self blue therefore they are black.


    Chickendales,

    They would be white if the adult bird was dominant white. They should not be dominant white or a combination of genes that would cause them to be almost white.

    Tim
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2011
  6. flspnr

    flspnr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 23, 2011
    Gibsonton, FL
    Quote:Both of the parents are black under their color. The genes that cause the blue and the white are recessive. One white gene and the one self blue gene( actually called lavender) that the offspring inherit will not make the offspring white or self blue therefore they are black.


    Chickendales,

    They would be white if the adult bird was dominant white. They should not be dominant white or a combination of genes that would cause them to be almost white.

    Tim

    Thanks thanks! That makes sense, I think. [​IMG]
     
  7. chickendales

    chickendales Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Both of the parents are black under their color. The genes that cause the blue and the white are recessive. One white gene and the one self blue gene( actually called lavender) that the offspring inherit will not make the offspring white or self blue therefore they are black.


    Chickendales,

    They would be white if the adult bird was dominant white. They should not be dominant white or a combination of genes that would cause them to be almost white.

    Tim

    why would they be dominant white? i had white split silkie i breed that looked white unless u had him next to a white
     
  8. chickendales

    chickendales Chillin' With My Peeps

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    and it might not be black bird under the white it couple be many # of colors
     
  9. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:The poster wanted a simple explanation- I gave the poster a simple explanation. I could not go into every possibility- I went with the highest probability.

    There are a number of ways that one can produce a white bird or almost white bird. I try to keep things as simple as possible.

    Tim
     
  10. flspnr

    flspnr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you both. So basically, it's a high probability of black or white, or almost white (depending on what the dominant color is or should be), but it could be anything. [​IMG] I appreciate the answers and the mini genetics lesson! I remember a tiny bit from high school with eye and hair color, but not how it works, and remember that it is very complicated. I'm assuming it would be complicated with chickens as well, especially when they won't do anything we expect them too lol.

    THANKS!! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2011

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