Fowl Pox, can it change types from hen to hen?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Dewolf, Dec 25, 2012.

  1. Dewolf

    Dewolf Chillin' With My Peeps

    63
    1
    74
    Dec 22, 2012
    Hello all,
    We purchase two 7 mos old chickens 3 wks ago. The Wyndotte had a sore that turned into multi le sores on face, comb and eye. I fed her an herbal mixture and within a week she improved now she has one dry spot left.
    However the polish now has sores and wet feathers around one eye. It appears there is one large lesion ( dry) on ear hole. My concern is the wet eye and bubbly sound when she talks or eats,, nostrils are clean.
    Can this be the wet form?
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

    23,342
    1,242
    448
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Yes. It's possible to have both dry and wet pox at the same time.
     
  3. Dewolf

    Dewolf Chillin' With My Peeps

    63
    1
    74
    Dec 22, 2012
    Thank you for the reply, she has gotten far worse this am. Her mouth is wide open and shaking her head.
     
  4. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,233
    130
    188
    Sep 14, 2012
    Hurricane, WV
    Give all birds Apple Cider Vinegar in their water, at the rate of four teaspoons to the gallon (but not in galvanized metal containers). It sorta 'strips' the coatings from the mouth, throat and intestines, and helps 'em to more easily expel mucus. This also improves the uptake of nutrients/vitamins, and boost their immune system. Another potential w/ diseases like fowlpox is secondary infection(s). You need to look into her mouth, and see if she has the wet form, or if there's something else goin' on. Be sure 'n update, once you've started the ACV and checked her mouth.
     
  5. Dewolf

    Dewolf Chillin' With My Peeps

    63
    1
    74
    Dec 22, 2012
    Thank you, I tried the vinegar however she would not drink much of the water with it. But we found out she would eat tangerines and crickets. That seamed to do the trick as she would not eat anything else. she is now more lively and eating again. her sores look to be shrinking and she is not gasping for air. Thank you so much!
     
  6. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,233
    130
    188
    Sep 14, 2012
    Hurricane, WV
    You're welcome, but it's probably the citric acid and the proteins from the crickets that's doin' the trick. I'd still add the vinegar, but perhaps droppin' the concentration initially would help (although most animals/birds drink more, rather than less ~'-)
     
  7. Dewolf

    Dewolf Chillin' With My Peeps

    63
    1
    74
    Dec 22, 2012
    The funny thing is that now she only wants tangerines, she wont eat her crumble and will only mess with her scratch. She has had a taste of the good stuff ; }
     
  8. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,233
    130
    188
    Sep 14, 2012
    Hurricane, WV
    Yeah ... had that happen w/ my own for a day or two, after givin' them the best of the slightly dried out 'cuties' and now? They'll be all upset w/ the grass clippings, after all the kitchen vegetables they've had. I stirred up a few pieces of the last of the cuties w/ their pellets, which made 'em start eating again.
     
  9. Dewolf

    Dewolf Chillin' With My Peeps

    63
    1
    74
    Dec 22, 2012
    Anyone know how contagious this is for future chicks? These birds have been kept in pens in the garage, they have only been contained 3 times in my yard in a 2x3 pen before we noticed sores ( not loose) These chickens will leave the property in a few days to there perm home. however I have chicks hatching in two weeks. I plan on bleaching all items they came in contact with but it is the yard that concerns me. I will of course not have the babies housed near the same area but mos from now if someone happens to wander loose, should I be concerned?
     
  10. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,233
    130
    188
    Sep 14, 2012
    Hurricane, WV
    Fowl pox can be transmitted by direct or indirect contact. The virus is highly resistant in dried scabs and under certain conditions may survive for months on contaminated premises. The disease may be transmitted by a number of species of mosquitoes. Mosquitoes can harbor infective virus for a month or more after feeding on affected birds. After the infection is introduced, it spreads within the flock by mosquitoes as well as direct and indirect contact. Recovered birds do not remain carriers.
    source: http://msucares.com/poultry/diseases/disviral.htm

    Something MSU fails to mention is the fact that many species of wild birds serve to carry and distribute this virus, so it isn't really ever gonna go away as a potential threat. The dried virus can remain viable can become distributed by air movement. So, you're gonna wanna clean up really well.

    Here's a much better alternative to bleach -- a $10 jug makes 32 gallons (which comes to 32¢ per gallon ~'-)

    OdoBan[​IMG] claims:

    A Deodorizer… eliminates unpleasant odors on washable surfaces *snip*

    A Sanitizer… kills 99.99% of germs such as †Streptococcus pyogenes (Strep), Escherichia coli 0157:H7 (E.coli)(pathogenic strain), Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus (Staph) and Klebsiella pneumoniae on hard, nonporous, nonfood contact surfaces in 60 seconds.

    A Disinfectant… fungicidal against germs ‡such as Trichophyton mentagrophyte (the athlete's foot fungus), when used on surfaces in areas such as locker rooms, dressing rooms, shower and bath areas and exercise facilities.

    A Mildewstat… effectively controls and inhibits the growth of mold and mildew.

    A Virucide*… kills *HIV-1 (AIDS Virus), Influenza A/Hong Kong and Herpes Simplex type 2 in 60 seconds.

    If, as you prepare/clean, you work from outside in, and then from inside out? You can almost be certain to have done all that you can to reduce the potential hazard that having this previous outbreak might otherwise be ... if you clean up before/after each visit to the new eggs/birds, and switch out your shoes as well, I doubt you're likely to see another.
     
    1 person likes this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by