Fowl pox on hens - will it affect my duck?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by mammabird34601, Nov 19, 2019.

  1. mammabird34601

    mammabird34601 Hatching

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    Nov 19, 2019
    Hello All - I'm an avid follower but first time poster - we've got fowl pox! I noticed scabs on two of my hens eyelids and black spots on the combs of a couple of the others over the weekend and spent several hours researching to confirm the presence of fowl pox. I have 24 hens, one rooster and a duck and have noticed the fowl pox on 5 of my girls. My duck has a separate pen but does socialize with the girls when I allow them to free range in the evenings and on the weekends. I read that fowl pox mostly affects chickens and turkeys but CAN affect ducks and other fowl. I purchased the vaccine last night and am going to vaccinate my birds tonight. Before I go around poking everyone, I wanted to know:

    - Does using the vaccination tool on affected and then unaffected birds transfer the virus? (Seems that if I'm vaccinating that wouldn't be the case but I want to be extra sure as I don't want to infect my entire flock.)
    - Do I vaccinate my duck, Gabby?
    I hate to inflict pain on any of my babies but understand it's necessary in this situation, I want to make sure I do it the right and best way.

    Thank you all!

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  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    It is my understanding (not a vet) is that an insect (such as a fly or mosquito) can transmit the disease from one to another infected bird. The main way that the disease is spread is by mosquitoes, and later by scabs which fall off, become powdery, and are then inhaled by other chickens over weeks or month. So I would not vaccinate any chickens with scabs. They should be immune to the virus after recovery. Here is the other thread you posted on, and I posted some links for more info in my second post:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/possible-fowl-pox.1339370/
     
    mammabird34601 likes this.
  3. mammabird34601

    mammabird34601 Hatching

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    Nov 19, 2019
    I'd read all of that material and did see the sentence at the bottom of the UFL webpage stating 'only healthy birds should be vaccinated' but I guess I wanted to be extra sure that I shouldn't vaccinate those already showing symptoms. Have you heard/read anything about vaccination of ducks? Since she does wander into the coop to occasionally eat out of the feeder she's definitely exposed, I think I'm going to vaccinate her just to be safe but haven't seen anyone else talk about vaccinating ducks. Thank you!
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    I would call the vaccine company. I just don’t have the answer.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2019
  5. mammabird34601

    mammabird34601 Hatching

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    Nov 19, 2019
    Gotcha, much appreciated.
     
    Eggcessive likes this.
  6. mammabird34601

    mammabird34601 Hatching

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    Nov 19, 2019
    Ok, so I took your wonderful advice to contact the vaccine company (Zoetis) and feel much better about this process. I actually spoke with one of their veterinarians and will share what she told me:
    - If performing a proactive vaccination on adult birds and given a choice, vaccinate during a molt.
    - If the bird is showing symptoms (large scabs on face/comb) do not vaccinate, they've already got it and once the wound heals and they shed the scabs they will have immunity.
    - The vaccine protects against the wet and dry virus and is most commonly transmitted via mosquito (yes, they can get it when the scabs slough off but that's less likely, so in my case my birds were most likely just mosquito bitten. Thank you, Florida).
    -*Vaccinate early in the day! I told her I was going to do it in the evening and she suggested vaccinating early in the day as some birds perch and sleep with their head under their wing. She says if you do it too close to bed time and they tuck their head under their wing they could rub their eye/head on the wound and get a pretty bad infection or possibly get the virus on their eye.
    - Be prepared for egg production to slow for up to two weeks and you do not have to discard the eggs following vaccination.
    - Do not vaccinate the duck! She said there isn't much data on ducks, they are not as likely to contract the virus as the chickens.
     
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Thank you for the very good information on the vaccine. You really do your homework!
     
    NHMountainMan likes this.
  8. mammabird34601

    mammabird34601 Hatching

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    Nov 19, 2019
    Ha, thank you! Yeah, I'm super paranoid when it comes to my feather babies, don't like to take any chances of doing the wrong thing or not doing something I should be. Actually, I also contacted Gary Butcher, he's a Professor of Avian Diseases and Extension Specialist at the UF College of Veterinary Medicine, and he seconded just about everything the vet with Zoetis told me (posted above) with the exception of not vaccinating in the evenings. He said it's really only a concern if you're sloppy when giving the vaccine and it should be fine to vaccinate in the evening. At this point I don't want to risk the virus spreading through Saturday morning when I would be able to vaccinate everyone so I think I'm going to do it this evening, as planned.
     
    NHMountainMan and Eggcessive like this.
  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    By the way welcome to BYC, I almost forgot.
     

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