Fowl pox treatments? WARNING: GROSS PICS

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by campingshaws, Nov 5, 2014.

  1. campingshaws

    campingshaws Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    ETA: do I really put neosporin IN their eyes and iodine IN their mouths?

    Hen #1
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    Hen #2
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    My first aid kit:
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    Background:
    My rooster was patient zero for fowl pox. He seems to be on the upswing. Hen #2 was the second case, she now has wet pox; her immune system was compromised by a lice infestation and severe coccidiosis (it was touch and go there for a bit). Hen #1 also had the lice infestation and moderate coccidiosis.

    Originally only the adults were affected, but now my pullets have lesions. I'll inspect them shortly.

    I was discussing this on a social thread, but it was suggested that I start a new thread here.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2014
  2. campingshaws

    campingshaws Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Updated pics from this morning:

    Hen #1: dry pox
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    Hen #2: dry and wet
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    Hen #3: dry and wet. Removed lesion from underneath tongue.
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    Last edited: Nov 5, 2014
  3. campingshaws

    campingshaws Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Pullet #1: all clear
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    Pullet #2: dry and wet
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    Pullet #3: dry and wet
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    Pullet #4: dry
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    Pullet #5: dry, nasal discharge and wheezing
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    Pullet #6: dry
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    Pullet #7: nasal discharge, no apparent pox
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    Last edited: Nov 5, 2014
  4. campingshaws

    campingshaws Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    This morning I drank a big cup of coffee and got to work. Caught the chickens one at a time and:

    - took pictures
    - drops of VetRX in the mouth
    - rinsed gunky eyes with saline
    - applied neosporin around eyes
    - applied iodine on lesions

    Tomorrow morning I'm going to weigh them. They all appear to be eating, but I don't know how much. They were all VERY reluctant to be caught and doctored, even those who are typically lap birds. They aren't acting sick at all.

    I didn't treat the roo, who is impossible to catch and doing fine anyway, or four laying hens affected in a separate coop. They have small black spots on their combs but not raised lesions.
     
  5. mrsc1951

    mrsc1951 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Best of luck to you. [​IMG]
     
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  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    In answer to your first question, it is saline or eye wash followed by Neosporin, Terramycin, or Vetericyn in the eyes, then
    iodine to the scabs. It's good they are eating. They are much easier to catch off the roost after dark to mess with. I use a geeky head lamp and turn on the red light where I can surprise them individually, do what I need to do, then put them back on the roost. Keep up the good work. Are you going to try some Tylan, Gallimycin, or oxytetracycline in their water? With the gunky eyes I would do it.
     
  7. campingshaws

    campingshaws Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Does adding tylan to the water do the same job as the injectable I hear about? I've never used tylan in any form, and I've never given an injection.
     
  8. Frizzlett98

    Frizzlett98 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The only Tylan you can put in the water is the soluble powder. Other than that it's injections or given orally. I researched this because I didn't want to give Tylan orally to over 20 birds one by one. I went with a different water soluble antibiotic instead of the injectable Tylan 50.
     
  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Tylan Soluble Powder is for the water, and it works well, as long as they are drinking well. Many people use the Tylan 50 both as a shot and given orally directly by mouth (not in water) but the injections get their quickest. In some illnesses such as respiratory diseases, chickens feel so poorly that they don't drink enough of the water, so that's where Tylan 50 is good to use as a shot or orally. Needles and syringes are required with Tylan 50. Tylan Powder is mixed 1 tsp of powder per gallon of water (and powder should always be added to the water, not the other way around) for 3-5 days. It is found in the cattle medicines of feed stores.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  10. campingshaws

    campingshaws Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Thanks so much! I'll have to see if I can find it. How often should I be treating their eyes?

    I put out scratch and cabbage leaves this afternoon. Everyone ate really well except pullet #2. I cleaned a few small patches out of her mouth and put her in a crate on the porch with some oatmeal. It was after dark by then, so she still didn't eat. I'll try again in the morning.
     

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