Fowl Pox?

Feb 21, 2021
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Hi all, this is Delilah. My bantam Japanese Cochin. She is 8 months old.
Are these fowl pox? I noticed them on Monday.
I put Iodine on them and gave her extra vitamins (nutri drench and rooster booster pellets in food).
I haven’t noticed pox on the other ladies yet, my 3 older hens had fowl pox last year, and I have one other hen that I got at the same time as Delilah in March.
Any suggestions for care? Should I quarantine her? They all free range so please suggest how to quarantine if that’s best, maybe just quarantine at night?
I also have Vet RX on hand so I could use that, but I’m not certain what it’s for, I just bought it and put in my chicken ER kit…see picture of ER kit in case there’s anything else I could use to help.

I have yet to find a vet in my area Fort Worth, TX that vaccinates chickens…

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Eggcessive

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It does look like pox with the scabs on comb, face, earlobe and around the eyes. It is a virus spread by mosquitoes and through dropped scabs. You can put iodine on scabs, but otherwise, do not disturb or remove them. Dropped scabs may become powdery and can remain infectious for some rime in the future. Normally healthy grown chickens recover in about a month, unless they develop the more severe wet pox that causes yellow material inside the beak and throat. Here is some reading about pox and vaccines:
https://the-chicken-chick.com/fowl-pox-prevention-treatmen/
http://extension.msstate.edu/publications/fowl-pox-backyard-flocks
 
Feb 21, 2021
55
57
66
It does look like pox with the scabs on comb, face, earlobe and around the eyes. It is a virus spread by mosquitoes and through dropped scabs. You can put iodine on scabs, but otherwise, do not disturb or remove them. Dropped scabs may become powdery and can remain infectious for some rime in the future. Normally healthy grown chickens recover in about a month, unless they develop the more severe wet pox that causes yellow material inside the beak and throat. Here is some reading about pox and vaccines:
https://the-chicken-chick.com/fowl-pox-prevention-treatmen/
http://extension.msstate.edu/publications/fowl-pox-backyard-flocks
Thank you! I went the the chickens chick site right away, I love her informational website. I appreciate the info and time you took to respond. Would you quarantine or let it run its course through my flock of 5? No symptoms out of the others yet. The 3 older hens had it last fall. 2 of my older hens are molting now.
 

Eggcessive

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Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Apr 3, 2011
63,175
56,641
1,322
southern Ohio
Well, most chickens are immune for life to the same strain after contracting the pox virus. There is a chicken strain, a turkey strain, and a pigeon strain. So, for that few chickens, I would probably let them all get exposed. If you had a large flock, it might be good to separate the ones with pox scabs. In TX and other southern states, pox is a lot more common and can be serious. If I had a bad case or lived there I would consider vaccinating young ones before they are 8 weeks old. It is available in large quantities (1000 dose )online. Here is where to find it:
https://www.jefferspet.com/products...MIraf-pK2W9AIV1XxvBB3G-wQhEAQYAiABEgJh-vD_BwE
 
Feb 21, 2021
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Thank you. Hopefully I am not prematurely posting this, but Delilah was the only one to get them this year. I was really surprised her sister Hazel didnt get them as I got the two chicks together as day(s) old chicks from TSC in March this year. They are different breeds, so perhaps Hazel came from a different breeder who vaccinated them?! Either way, I’m glad to see the others stay healthy. Poor little Dee has has a rough fall- Pox, Molting, and a portion of her top beak chipped off.
 

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