fowl pox

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by fabfour, Nov 21, 2009.

  1. fabfour

    fabfour New Egg

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    Nov 21, 2009
    do I need to worry about my kids handling the chickens that I just figured out have fowl pox? obviously I request they wash up after handling; but.......
     
  2. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2009
    DFW
    We're dealing with fowl pox right now, too. This comes from everything I've read and also from our vet: humans don't catch fowl pox. However, if you have other birds, you could infect your other birds with fowl pox if you don't wash your hands thoroughly and change clothing after you handle infected birds.

    We have indoor birds (parrots and doves) and we're being very careful with the things mentioned above, as well as wearing different shoes outdoors than the ones we wear indoors. Contagious to other birds, but not to humans.
     
  3. fabfour

    fabfour New Egg

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    Nov 21, 2009
    whew! thanks; now we will inspect them (chickens) to see how infected they really are -- noticed the combs and one has it on face (eye area)

    wish us luck; just started getting these girls to produce!
     
  4. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2009
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    You should expect egg laying to slow down or even cease while your chickens are going through avian pox. That's normal. They'll get back to laying once they're recovered, but that could take weeks. Dry pox looks ugly, but usually doesn't bother the birds that much.

    Keep an eye out for wet pox, though. That's when the lesions appear in the bird's mouth and throat. Watch to see if any of your birds is drooling, not eating/drinking, or having labored breathing.
     

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