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Free range egg prices. opinions please!

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by leedlebee, Mar 20, 2013.

  1. leedlebee

    leedlebee New Egg

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    Oct 24, 2012
    Maryland
    Hi, I was hoping for some opinions. I have been selling (registered) eggs for almost a year now, I have been charging 3.00 a dozen but I increased prices because I am spending more on feed a week then I am making. I increased to 4.00 a dozen. My chickens are true free range and I always buy the best for them. I spend several hours a day caring for them. I live in Maryland and the store price for "cage free" at the stores are between 3.00 - 5.00 a dozen. I had a new customer stop today and tell me that I am just as expensive as the store. I always thought we should be since we are so small scale and I don't get my feed at wholesale prices. I just spent 100.00 on feed today (which will last about 11-14 days) and 200.00 for 500 egg cartons (which by state law I can't reuse) I have also had several customers tell me my price (when it was 3.00 doz.) was much too little.Where I live the average cost of a 50 lb/ bag of feed is 16.50. What are you charging a doz. I always sold out of eggs everyday when my price was 3.00 doz. Please help I am torn on prices. What is average and fair? Thank You!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2013
  2. TOP KNOT

    TOP KNOT Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 10, 2013
    SHERIDAN IL
    Well I check craigs list in the area for the going prices. I would tell the lady that store bought eggs are no comparison to your free range eggs. The factory farms feed god knows what and have other unknown things/chemicals. It costs more to feed quality and if she is thinking farm fresh should be cheaper...well she is wrong!! I would charge the $4, you may gain some and you may lose some customers. Its all about the quality of the egg and our health from eating them!!
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Raising prices beyond what the local market can bear is an issue. You can try to educate your customer base. But, if you simply cannot sell eggs at $4 a dozen, then you'll have to make some choices. This is the business side of this. If you cannot raise prices, you'll have to cut costs.

    Your feed price is far too high. It is extremely difficult to have a profit margin with feed costs at $34 a hundred. Our local mill is $21 a hundred for Layer. Still? One doesn't get rich selling a few dozen eggs per week, but I sure wouldn't do it at a loss either.

    Finally, if you cannot raise prices or reduce expenses, then you'll face downsizing. This is business math 101.
    Just the way it is.

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. kimberliem

    kimberliem Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 12, 2009
    Here in Northern California, it's not unusual to see organic free range eggs selling for $7-8/dozen at the farmer's markets. $3/dozen is a steal!
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. leedlebee

    leedlebee New Egg

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    Oct 24, 2012
    Maryland
    It seems a lot of customers assume that since my chickens are free range that I don't feed them, and that I am making some huge profit. (if only that was the case![​IMG]) No really I wouldn't be doing this whole thing If I wasn't crazy about CHICKENS. When I do tell them how much feed they eat they are shocked and I don't think they believe me! I have some pullets that should be laying in a few months, it will surely help matters. Thank you all for your tips and insight I really do appreciate it!
     
  6. leedlebee

    leedlebee New Egg

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    Oct 24, 2012
    Maryland
    Maybe I should buy my feed up north and sell my eggs in California [​IMG] lol!
     

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