free range question

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by chicknmania, Nov 15, 2009.

  1. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    I have been reading a lot on here b/c we just got a pair of peafowl also and have never had them before. The breeder told us to keep them penned for a month before free-ranging. They are in the barn with our chickens, in a separate pen right now. After a month it will be mid December, it will be cold and I wondered if it would be ok to let them out, as I'm guessing they would not go too far anyway in the cold and possibly snow? Or should we keep them penned up longer? We can't keep them separated from the chickens forever, unfortunately...if I had known this would be a problem we probably wouldn't have gotten them. We will give our chooks aviacharge in the winter, is this ok to give the peafowl, also?
     
  2. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    Will have to leave the cold winter advise up to someone else.. sunny southern California here.. one thing I read, peafowl seem not react very well to snow, from that I'd recommend not letting them out when there is a lot of snow on ground in case they jump up on something snow free and then refuse to come down on the snow covered ground.

    How long to confine depends on age of the peafowl too. Birds younger than 6 months are the easiest and need the least time, a month will work fine for many of these. Older than 8-a year, best to keep 2 months.. adults definitely recommended to keep confined as long as possible- 4 to 6 months would be good.

    It is also important their confinement pen gives them good clear view of their new home. If being kept in barn without outside run, that is not ideal.. once they are let out of a "closed, no open view barn" everything is completely brand new to them again and they will be quite excited/nervous/"shocked".

    This might seem to be a pain, but is worth it. Peafowl are different from other poultry in personality and then there's the beauty of an adult male in full display. And he lets you walk right up to him to see his display right close up. Maybe then you'll be very glad you never reconsidered...
     
  3. NateinFL

    NateinFL Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Congrats on the new peacocks. Keep an eye out for illness the first couple months as they stress BIG time when they are relocated. At the first sign of illness you should start preparing to treat them as they deteriorate rapidly. From what I hear, after the first month or two, if they survive that, they will be very tough birds for a long, long time. Good luck!
     
  4. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Well I hope so. I am getting really discouraged as a lot of people I talk to tell me what a big mistake we made, getting peacocks. I am tired of hearing about what a hassle they are. We can't really keep them where they get a vew of the whole outside, we have a tractor outside but we will be bringing it in the barn when the weather gets colder, and the peas will probably go in the tractor when we bring it into the barn. The plan is they will stay in the tractor for a week or two in December before we let them out, so they can get a better idea where they're at, but it will be too cold to keep them outside then.These are young, undoubtedly under six months. I suppose they could stay in the tractor inside the barn all winter but I think they will be unhappy in such a confirned space, plus we use the tractor for some of our chickens inside the barn in the winter, too. Wouldn't they follow the chickens after they've been here all winter, as far as going outside and coming back in at night? Right now they are in a coop with high walls, they can see out the wire top part of the walls of the coop if they sit on the perches, but otherwise, they can't see out. The coop they are in now is inside the barn.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2009
  5. Pavo Royale

    Pavo Royale Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My peas are not much trouble. I just worm them a few times a year and give them Tylan if I see something wrong. But, if they WERE a lot of trouble, they would be worth every bit of it. If you like chickens, your're gonna love these guys! (true words of encouragement here) Once they are established they are very hardy.

    How old are they?
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2009
  6. NateinFL

    NateinFL Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Peacocks are not a hassle don't worry about what they say, you're gonna like them so much you will be watching them all day and taking sooo many pictures of them to impress your friends. Oh, and hopefully you dont have any very close neighbors as they do call a lot during breeding season but its such an awesome call, I love hearing it but not everyone agrees with me on that.
     
  7. Boggy Bottom Bantams

    Boggy Bottom Bantams Overrun With Chickens

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    I agree with all, The Aviacharge is great for them too by the way. I too am in a hot climate Like Kev, south Georgia, BUT there are tons of people in way colder locations than you, and they do just find outside, as long as they are not green birds (Javas) They are the only ones that are not cold hardy. Any of the blues do just fine in it. I would let them out after 1-3 months if that is your plan, especially if they are grown, if they are this years, you may want to keep them inside if it gets horrible. However, If you have them in the barn with the chickens, penned together or not, they are still together, so you really aren't accomplishing anything there as far as separation of the 2 goes.
    You are going to really like them as they are terribly addictive!
     
  8. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Thank you everyone for the info. I believe they are India Blues. The way we are set up, they will never be totally separate from the chickens, unless there is some contagious illness that we know of. We'll just have to see what happens, I guess. Anyway, right now they seem ok, I think they are a cock and hen, He is very bold and curious, she is considerably shyer, but both are doing well so far. I hope we can enjoy them, I have always wanted some.
     
  9. jensen

    jensen Out Of The Brooder

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    Nathhowe, I do agree with you... love the calling of peafowl and, surprisingly, some of the neighbors do, too!
     
  10. deerman

    deerman Rest in Peace 1949-2012

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    Yes they do fine in Ohio winters. Mine have a unheated barn, they go in to get out of the cold.
     

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