Free ranging livestock may come to an end.

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by chickened, Mar 30, 2012.

  1. chickened

    chickened Overrun With Chickens

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  2. RHRanch

    RHRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

    Completely understandable considering the enviornmental damage that feral pigs cause. Here in California there are many types of animals (ferrets, etc) that we cannot legally keep because of the hazards to agriculture and native wildlife and humans. We too have a feral pig problem. In one case here feral pigs contaminated spinach and made a lot of people seriously ill.

    Also, it isn't free ranging that is the issue, its the type of pigs which are being set loose for (I am guessing canned hunting).
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2012
  3. punk-a-doodle

    punk-a-doodle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm pretty much never for bans. Except...I guess I'd be for a ban on bans. Better solution to me:
    Hogs fitting the description MUST be chipped/tagged/tattooed/marked permanently in some way. Those that are not tagged are to be killed, and those that are tagged and are found running free will mean a monetary penalty for the owners.
     
  4. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens


    Ditto.
     
  5. booker81

    booker81 Redneck Tech Girl

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    This has been hot in MI for a few years - here's an article from 2007:

    http://blog.mlive.com/flintjournal/newsnow/2007/11/photo_courtesy_of_steve.html

    The pig in the picture was shot a few miles from where I live. It's pretty much open season on wild boar here - if you have a valid hunting license for anything, you can legally shoot one. There has been issues (as noted in the article) about wilds getting in with domestic and causing increased risk for disease transfer (remember here in MI, we also have the Bovine Tuberculosis/deer transmittal problem).

    Invasives aren't a fun thing to deal with. Often they are brought in and found to be pretty sweet, but then turn around and do horrific damage. This goes for both plant and animal invasives. Unfortunately, many folks depend on the propagation of invasives of any sort, and when the time comes to crack down to preserve native species, they get hit.

    For me, I've not encountered wild boar, but I'm in my 5th year of battling a plant invasive (Autumn Olive) on my family property, and I curse the person who brought them to MI (DNR for road blocks). The introduction and propogation of invasive plants and animals that destroy native plants and animals is just not fun.
     
  6. chickened

    chickened Overrun With Chickens

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    When managing Invasive species the most popular approach is control not eradication. With hogs if they took the money and put a bounty on them it would reduce the numbers. It would not eradicate them because some would just turn more loose and that would happen anyhow so if you reduce the population you reduce the damage. I work with land managers all the time and that is the best approach according to them. And the cheapest when hunters help.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2012
  7. conny63malies

    conny63malies Overrun With Chickens

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    Face it those feral wild pigs/eurasian/ russian/razor backs are just like pit bulls and city chickens. Soem people were irresponsible . Damage was caused and now the responisble owners have to suffer. But its the trophy hunters fault too that demand the exotic . People imported european razorbacks knowing very little about them. I grew up in a very wooded area in germany. We lost crops because of them. You can also ask american soldiers that have been out in the field in germany, they are fast and extremly aggresive. They have hurt quite a few pepoleor chased them up trees. I can understand that they want to get rid of them. They compete with native wildlife
     
  8. booker81

    booker81 Redneck Tech Girl

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    This state has been too broke to put a bounty on anything, but rather has offered the option to shoot them for free. For hunters such as myself, this is reason enough to try to get them. I've heard of a few of the game ranches who started the infestation by releasing their pigs to the wild - probably because the economy tanked and there no longer was money in ranching them for hunts. One of these was local to my property (I believe the guy was arrested or at least fined).

    As for the farmer referenced in your posted article, it's already been confirmed he can keep and raise his Mangalitsa pigs as long as he doesn't cross them with Russian boars.

    This isn't a new order - it's been ongoing for a few years, and it's been known for at least two years that wild boar ranches will need to hunt off and stop raising wild boar unless the legislature passed laws for regulating swine hunting ranches. Previously, MI didn't have any sort of regulation for "Sporting Swine Facility". The bill that would need to regulate it has stalled out in Senate back in 2011 of course (go legislature for not doing their jobs).

    If people want to be upset, they can look to themselves and their elected officials. This order was set in Dec 2010, and the House Bill 4503 in 2011 would have been what would help with "control" of ranches. Instead, nothing was done, and now the order from 2010 is set to take action (it provided 2 years for regulatory laws to come through), and NOW folks are upset.
     
  9. dainerra

    dainerra Chillin' With My Peeps

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    having lived in FL and now in AR, I can tell you that feral swine are a HUGE problem. They destroy farmland by the acre, are extremely aggressive, and have no fear of attacking humans - esp a sow with piglets. They also have no natural predators. I'm not one to agree with corporate farmers, but this time I do. 1 sow can have 20 piglets a year, so do the math.

    Yes, there are sportsman who like the hunt. Of course, those type of "hunters" are also the ones who have caused rabies epidemics in the past by transporting racoons from state to state just to stage a hunt. Irresponsible farmers and hunters have let the pigs loose in the countryside and now everyone has to pay the price. I don't feel sorry for either of them.

    For example, estimates put the feral hog population in TX as 1.5 MILLION and growing.
    damage to property:
    Rooting and trampling activity for food can damage agricultural crops, fields, and livestock feeding and watering facilities. Often wildlife feeders are damaged or destroyed. They also destabilize wetland areas, springs, creeks and tanks by excessive rooting and wallowing. In addition to habitat destruction and alteration, hogs can destroy forestry plantings and damage trees

    damage to animals:
    While not active predators, wild hogs may prey on fawns, young lambs, and kid goats. If the opportunity arises, they may also destroy and consume eggs of ground nesting birds, such as turkeys and quail.

    spread disease:
    Various diseases of wild hogs include pseudorabies, swine brucellosis, tuberculosis, bubonic plague, tularemia, hog cholera, foot and mouth disease, and anthrax. Internal parasites include kidney worms, stomach worms, round worms and whipworms. Liver flukes and trichinosis are also found in hogs. External parasites include dog ticks, fleas and hog lice.

    http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/nuisance/feral_hogs/
     
  10. chickened

    chickened Overrun With Chickens

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    What got me interested in all this was in Oregon we have an established population of wild hogs now and they got here two ways. One was escapees from a game ranch and the other was from California migrations. They spend thousands of dollars on studies and research here and do really nothing on the ground. Most animals considered game animals that have nearly been wiped out in the pat were done very efficiently by the bounty system (buffalo?) it works well, the animals will never be eradicated that is unrealistic and not cost effective and IMO they need be managed like any other species.

    Timber companies get bear damage in the spring so they in turn open their land to the public during bear season to control the population which in return reduces the damage. They have been doing this for years very successfully.

    In California wild boar is the #1 game animal and the #1 fish is stripers both of which are introduced species.

    Out west here the large private landowners as a rule are very reluctant to let the state wildlife folks on their land and for good reason as they have been damaged by them and some of their policies, mainly the kind that does things without their permission behind their backs, it really makes landowners mad when they come in and steamroll landowners.

    I have a seasonal stream on my place and I have had ODFW trespass here looking for fish more than once. They say "we tried to contact you", I always say "can you write?"
     

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