Freedom Vs. Red Rangers... an observation

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by chicknshrimp, Aug 7, 2014.

  1. chicknshrimp

    chicknshrimp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know they're a little different but I have 2 red rangers that were hatched by a broody 4 wks ago and 6 freedom rangers that were bought locally and raised in a brooder and are 3 wks old and are totally different birds.

    Just wanted to post how giant and cornish-like the freedom rangers are... they are way cuter than cornish (they're golden and brown) and maybe grow a tiny bit slower but are a whole different bird than my red rangers. They already sit most of the day and have trouble walking [​IMG]. The two red rangers who live with mom are "normal chickens"...they're sleek, fast, and have long normal legs. The freedoms are fat, huge breasted, waddle slowly, and have thick legs. I wish I had a freedom with the broody for comparison but she wouldn't take it. Here are some pics. (all free-range during the day and mom-less chicks roost in a brooder at night.


    Here is my buff orp with a 4 wk old Red Ranger...the freedoms are twice the weight and size
    [​IMG]

    I know there is no scale but here are the Freedom Rangers at almost 3 wks old with 3 wk old silver laced wyandottes and a 6 wk old easter egger for size comparison... they're GIANTS!
    [​IMG]

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  2. Do you like the faster growth on the Freedom Rangers? Better for raising meat right? Or do you prefer the red rangers slower more "regular" growth rate?

    Usually the feed conversion to weight gain is better on faster maturing meaties. Slower growth is a bit more natural and the birds act a bit more "normal".

    Personally, I do like em both as far as taste but give the edge to faster growth. What is your preference?

    Wish ya the best.
     
  3. chicknshrimp

    chicknshrimp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I like that they mature faster and the feed conversion is better but I feel bad raising something that has a lesser quality of life due to their freakish size. They're still pretty small so Ill post again once they are older and give my final verdict. We live at elevation and a few of our cornish got ascites, hopefully these little guys do better. Thanks!
     
  4. Ibicella

    Ibicella Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Everett, WA
    I'm very taken with our Red Rangers. They are listed as meat birds, but I'm thinking in actuality they are really more dual-purpose.

    I started with 12 and still have 12. No health problems so far. They were excellent foragers from day one. I really like that they are very healthy, hardy, and surprisingly friendly hybrid. They are quite intelligent and very much enjoy hopping into my lap for napping and cuddling.

    I personally like the slower growth of them for less hassle with their health and more taste. My personal choice is I would rather spend extra time and feed for chicken meat that has some flavor.

    I may end up keeping the smallest Ranger to experiment with as a layer. Since they have a lot of Rhode Island Red in their genetics, I've lots of positive stories from folks who have kept a couple for eggs.

    Kind of wish I could keep one of the cockerels since one already is showing the makings of being an excellent roo (as in he's very friendly and gentle with the humans, already helps the others find food and does peace-keeping and look out duties already at only one-month old, not as in breeding stock), but city ordinances prohibit them.

    Here's a good picture from a couple of weeks ago showing the comparison of size to a partridge Plymouth Rock and a Cayuga duckling. The Ranger is the light colored one at the bottom. All three birds have the same birthday.


    [​IMG]
     
  5. chicknshrimp

    chicknshrimp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What cute little babies you have!

    I agree, I think so far I like the reds much better, mine forage really well too and are generally healthy and active birds. Ill have to see at slaughter time how everyone does but I would rather feed them a little longer for a healthier more flavorful bird.

    Enjoy your babies!
     

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