Freezing eggs??????

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Squirtchy2009, Sep 7, 2009.

  1. Squirtchy2009

    Squirtchy2009 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    When i get an fertiale egg, how do i freeze, it, do i put it in the fridge to keep it cool, if so how long for and at what temp? [​IMG]

    PS: i know you cant freeze them, so do i put them in a fridge to keep them cool, it must work as a fertailsed egg can go sometime without being heated before it starts to develop.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2009
  2. sonew123

    sonew123 Poultry Snuggie

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    Quote:why would you want to freeze a fertile egg? I have never heard of that. I have heard of refridgerating them until you are ready to incubate. I mean if you have a few hens laying and you want to the eggs to be the same "incuabtion age" and all.. Otherwise at 50 degrees will hold your eggs until your putting them in a bator together..
     
  3. Emzyyy

    Emzyyy Runs with Deer

    Jul 14, 2008
    Derby Kansas
    Um you know after you freeze it it won't matter if its fertile or not its not going to hatch after that and the shell will break because liquids expand when frozen.
     
  4. Squirtchy2009

    Squirtchy2009 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:why would you want to freeze a fertile egg? I have never heard of that. I have heard of refridgerating them until you are ready to incubate. I mean if you have a few hens laying and you want to the eggs to be the same "incuabtion age" and all.. Otherwise at 50 degrees will hold your eggs until your putting them in a bator together..

    [​IMG] thats what i meant, how can i keep them cool until i have enough to go in my bator?

    Do i just shove them in my fridge? [​IMG]
     
  5. Emzyyy

    Emzyyy Runs with Deer

    Jul 14, 2008
    Derby Kansas
    Quote:why would you want to freeze a fertile egg? I have never heard of that. I have heard of refridgerating them until you are ready to incubate. I mean if you have a few hens laying and you want to the eggs to be the same "incuabtion age" and all.. Otherwise at 50 degrees will hold your eggs until your putting them in a bator together..

    [​IMG] thats what i meant, how can i keep them cool until i have enough to go in my bator?

    Do i just shove them in my fridge? [​IMG]

    Yupp I'm not sure how long they can stay in there I'd say a few weeks most? Some people here have hatched store eggs.
     
  6. walkswithdog

    walkswithdog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You don't freeze eggs to hold them. 50-60 degrees is a decent temp for holding them til you have enough to incubate. Most people shoot for less than two weeks.

    I myself have incubated near frozen (34-35 degrees), and muddy/cold 40-45 degree eggs and old (five weeks room temperature 72 degree) eggs to significant success. I am not a person very tolerant of rules. And I also do not demand 100% hatch rates to consider a hatch successful, so I try a broader scope of eggs than is normal.
     
  7. the simple life

    the simple life Chillin' With My Peeps

    If I am collecting eggs to hatch I keep them on the counter in the pantry until I get enough to set in the incubator and I had 100 percent hatch.
    I know there are people on this forum that have kept them in the frig or have at the last minute decided they wanted to hatch eggs and pulled some out of the frig and set them.
    I think you are better off leaving them at room temperature, they will not start to develop on their own if that is what you are worried about, we should be so lucky;)
    If for some reason you have already put eggs in the frig then you need to bring them to room temperature before you can set them.
     
  8. Squirtchy2009

    Squirtchy2009 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Its all good. As of yet i havent put them in the fridge, i shall just leave them in my shed, not to hot or to cold, until i am ready to bator them [​IMG]
     
  9. the simple life

    the simple life Chillin' With My Peeps

    Good luck with your hatch. [​IMG]
     
  10. Akane

    Akane Overrun With Chickens

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    Eggs will not start to develop until they are kept in the mid to high 90s F for an extended period of time. They will do nothing until then. You could leave them all sit outside at 80F for a long time and when you set them or a hen sits on them they will all develop at the same rate and hatch at the same time.

    The only reason for storing eggs a certain way is to keep them viable. After a time fertile eggs will I suppose you could say die. They will no longer be able to develop. 50s-60s F is the ideal temperature and preferably you want to store them for 1 week or less. Most agree no more than 10days for the best hatch rate. However that's not to say if you store them 11 days or at 70F you suddenly won't get any chicks. You may not even notice the impact or you might get a couple chicks less. Those are only ideal storage conditions for the best chance at the highest hatch rate. If you do end up not being able to set eggs for more than 12-14days you may get a higher hatch rate from keeping them refrigerated especially if your house isn't kept cool. Provided your fridge doesn't have temperature issues. One person did have their eggs freeze while in the fridge. Eggs don't freeze until considerably lower than 32F so their fridge definitely had to be off. It might be a good idea to stick an extra thermometer in there with them if you decide to do that. It is also usually suggested to prop up one side of the carton and tilt it back and forth every day. Eggs should be stored point down. All my eggs go in to the fridge point down and don't get tilted unless I'm collecting them to sell to people. I haven't noticed much if any drop in hatch rate by doing that and it's easier than trying to keep them sorted into eating or hatching eggs before storing them.
     

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